Author : All posts by ilikesql

15

Jan

In this week’s webinar Ted Pattison will be covering how to develop Custom Visuals for Power BI. Power BI has supported the development of custom visuals since its initial release. However, the custom visuals platform has been constantly evolving and READ MORE

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15

Jan

Microsoft Azure portal January 2019 update
Microsoft Azure portal January 2019 update

This month we’re bringing you updates that improve the ease of navigation of the landing page, add to dashboard tile features, and increase functionality in Azure Container Instances.

Sign in to the Azure portal now and see for yourself everything that’s new. Download the Azure mobile app.

Here’s the list of January updates to the Azure portal: Landing page New Azure portal home page Dashboard Shared time range for tiles on dashboards Azure Container Instances (ACI) New start functionality

Let’s look at each of these updates in detail.

Landing page New Azure portal home page

The new Azure portal home page is a quick and easy entry point into Azure. From there, you can find recently visited resources, navigate to commonly used services, and discover how to use specialized services to learn, monitor, secure, and optimize your applications and infrastructure.

The landing page has been designed with the following goals:

Improve discoverability of our services. We start by highlighting some of the most popular services in the “Azure services” section at the top, but we also provide access to the entire list. Help you to make better use of Azure. All the services in the “Make the most out

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14

Jan

Let’s talk about trace flags
Let’s talk about trace flags

https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/sql_server_team/lets-talk-about-trace-flags/Source: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/sql_server_team/lets-talk-about-trace-flags/   One of the most confusing aspects of SQL Server configuration is often trace flags. There are lots of trace flags out there, and while many of them are documented, when to use them and when not to READ MORE

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14

Jan

Azure IoT automatic device management helps deploying firmware updates at scale

Automatic device management in Azure IoT Hub automates many of the repetitive and complex tasks of managing large device fleets over the entirety of their lifecycles. Since the feature shipped in June 2018, there has been a lot of interest in the firmware update use case. This blog article highlights some of the ways you can kickstart your own implementation.

Update the Azure IoT DevKit firmware over-the-air using automatic device management

The Azure IoT DevKit over-the-air (OTA) firmware update project is a great implementation of automatic device management. With automatic device management, you can target a set of devices based on their properties, define a desired configuration, and let IoT Hub update devices whenever they come into scope. This is performed using an automatic device configuration, which will also allow you to summarize completion and compliance, handle merging and conflicts, and roll out configurations in a phased approach. The Azure IoT DevKit implementation defines an automatic device configuration that specifies a collection of device twin desired properties related to the firmware version and image. It also specifies a set of useful metrics that are important for monitoring a deployment across a device fleet. The target condition can be specified based

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14

Jan

Create alerts to proactively monitor your data factory pipelines

Data integration is complex and helps organizations combine data and business processes in hybrid data environments. The increase in volume, variety, and velocity of data has led to delays in monitoring and reacting to issues. Organizations want to reduce the risk of data integration activity failures and the impact it cause to other downstream processes. Manual approaches to monitoring data integration projects are inefficient and time consuming. As a result, organizations want to have automated processes to monitor and manage data integration projects to remove inefficiencies and catch issues before they affect the entire system. Organizations can now improve operational productivity by creating alerts on data integration events (success/failure) and proactively monitor with Azure Data Factory.

To get started, simply navigate to the Monitor tab in your data factory, select Alerts & Metrics, and then select New Alert Rule.

Select the target data factory metric for which you want to be alerted.

Then, configure the alert logic. You can specify various filters such as activity name, pipeline name, activity type, and failure type for the raised alerts. You can also specify the alert logic conditions and the evaluation criteria.

Finally, configure how you want to be

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14

Jan

Our 2019 Resolution: Help you transform your 2008 server applications with Azure!

This blog post was co-authored by Erin Chapple, CVP, Microsoft Windows Server, and Rohan Kumar, CVP, Microsoft Data.

The beginning of a new year is always a time to reflect on our plans. At Microsoft, with the end of support for 2008 servers looming, we’ve been thinking about how we can help you with your server refresh journey. How can we enable you to take advantage of all the cutting-edge innovations available in Azure?

And as we take stock, we believe that the 3 reasons why Azure is the best place to transform your 2008 server applications are:

Security: With security threats becoming more and more sophisticated, increasing your organization’s security policies should be top of mind. The good news is that Azure is the most trusted cloud in the market with more certifications than any other public cloud. Innovation: We have an optimized, low-risk path to help you embrace Azure. And once you are there, you can continue to innovate with fully-managed services such as Azure SQL Database, Azure Cosmos DB and Azure AI. Cost savings: By taking advantage of Azure Hybrid Benefit and Extended Security updates, you can save significantly. For example, moving a hundred 2008 servers to

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14

Jan

AI is the new normal: Recap of 2018

The year 2018 was a banner year for Azure AI as over a million Azure developers, customers, and partners engaged in the conversation on digital transformation. The next generation of AI capabilities are now infused across Microsoft products and services including AI capabilities for Power BI.

Here are the top 10 Azure AI highlights from 2018, across AI Services, tools and frameworks, and infrastructure at a glance:

AI services

1. Azure Machine Learning (AML) service with new automated machine learning capabilities.

2. Historical milestones in Cognitive Services including unified Speech service.

3. Microsoft is first to enable Cognitive Services in containers.

4. Cognitive Search and basketball

5. Bot Framework v4 SDK, offering broader language support (C#, Python, Java, and JavaScript) and extensibility models.

AI tools and frameworks

6. Data science features in Visual Studio Code.

7. Open Neural Network Exchange (ONNX) runtime is now open source.

8. ML.Net and AI Platform for Windows developers.

AI infrastructure

9. Azure Databricks

10. Project Brainwave, integrated with AML.

With many exciting developments, why are these moments the highlight? Read on, as this blog begins to explain the importance of these moments.

AI services

These services span pre-built

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14

Jan

Azure.Source – Volume 65
Azure.Source – Volume 65

Now generally available Announcing the general availability of Azure Data Box Disk

Azure Data Box Disk, an SSD-based solution for offline data transfer to Azure, is now generally available in the US, EU, Canada, and Australia, with more country/regions to be added over time. Each disk is an 8 TB SSD that can copy data up to USB 3.1 speeds and support the SATA II and III interfaces. The disks are encrypted using 128-bit AES encryption and can be locked with your custom passkeys. In addition, check out the end of this post for an announcement about the public preview for Blob Storage on Azure Data Box. When this feature is enabled, you will be able to copy data to Blob Storage on Data Box using blob service REST APIs.

New year, newly available IoT Hub Device Provisioning Service features

The following Azure IoT Hub Device Provisioning Service features are now generally available: Symmetric key attestation support; Re-provisioning support; Enrollment-level allocation rules; and Custom allocation logic. The IoT Hub Device Provisioning Service is a helper service for IoT Hub that enables zero-touch, just-in-time provisioning to the right IoT hub without requiring human intervention, enabling you to provision millions of

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14

Jan

Azure Backup for virtual machines behind an Azure Firewall

This blog post primarily talks about how Azure Firewall and Azure Backup can be leveraged to provide comprehensive protection to your data. The former protects your network, while the latter backs up your data to the cloud. Azure Firewall, now generally available, is a cloud-based network security service that protects your Azure Virtual Network resources. It is a fully stateful firewall as a service with built-in high availability and unrestricted cloud scalability. With Azure Firewall you can centrally create, enforce, and log application and network connectivity policies across subscriptions and virtual networks. It uses a static public IP address for your virtual network resources, allowing outside firewalls to identify traffic originating from your virtual network.

Backup of Azure Virtual Machines

In a typical scenario, you may have Azure Virtual Machines (VMs) running business-critical workloads behind an Azure Firewall. While this is an effective means of shielding your VMs against network threats, you would also want to protect your data in the VMs using Azure VM Backup. This further reduces the odds of being exposed to several risks. Azure Backup protects the data in your VMs by safely storing it in your Recovery Services Vault. This involves moving data from your

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10

Jan

Best practices for alerting on metrics with Azure Database for MariaDB monitoring

On December 4, 2018 Microsoft’s Azure Database for open sources announced the general availability of MariaDB. This blog intends to share some guidance and best practices for alerting on the most commonly monitored metrics for MariaDB.

Whether you are a developer, a database analyst, a site reliability engineer, or a DevOps professional at your company, monitoring databases is an important part of maintaining the reliability, availability, and performance of your MariaDB server. There are various metrics available for you in Azure Database for MariaDB to get insights on the behavior of the server. You can also set alerts on these metrics using the Azure portal or Azure CLI.

With modern applications evolving from a traditional on-premises approach to becoming more hybrid or cloud native, there is also a need to adopt some best practices for a successful monitoring strategy on a hybrid/public cloud. Here are some example best practices on how you can use monitoring data on your MariaDB server and areas you can consider improving based on these various metrics.

Active connections

Sample threshold (percentage or value): 80 percent of total connection limit for greater than or equal to 30 minutes, checked every five minutes.

Things to check

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