Author : All posts by ilikesql

24

Apr

Azure Toolkit for Eclipse integrates with HDInsight Ambari and supports Spark 2.2

To provide more authentication options, Azure Toolkit for Eclipse now supports integration with HDInsight clusters through Ambari for job submission, cluster resource browse and storage files navigate. You can easily link or unlink any cluster by using an Ambari-managed username and password, which is independent of your Azure sign-in credentials.  The Ambari connection applies to normal Spark and Hive hosted within HDInsight on Azure. These additions give you more flexibility in how you connect to your HDInsight clusters in addition to your Azure subscriptions while also simplifying your experiences in submitting Spark jobs.

With this release, you can benefit the new functionalities and consume the new libraries & APIs from Spark 2.2 in Azure Toolkit for Eclipse. You can create, author and submit a Spark 2.2 project to Spark 2.2 cluster.  With the backward compatibility of Spark 2.2, you can also submit your existing Spark 2.0 and Spark 2.1 projects to a Spark 2.2 cluster.

How to link a cluster Click Link a cluster from Azure Explorer.

Enter Cluster Name, Storage Account, Storage Key, then select a container from Storage Container, at last, input Username and Password. Click the OK button to link cluster.

Please note that you

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24

Apr

Azure Toolkit for IntelliJ integrates with HDInsight Ambari and supports Spark 2.2

To provide more authentication options, Azure Toolkit for IntelliJ now supports integration with HDInsight clusters through Ambari for job submission, cluster resource browse and storage files navigate. You can easily link or unlink any cluster by using an Ambari-managed username and password, which is independent of your Azure sign-in credentials.  The Ambari connection applies to normal Spark and Hive hosted within HDInsight on Azure. These additions give you more flexibility in how you connect to your HDInsight clusters in addition to your Azure subscriptions while also simplifying your experiences in submitting Spark jobs.

With this release, you can benefit the new functionalities and consume the new libraries & APIs from Spark 2.2 in Azure Toolkit for IntelliJ. You can create, author and submit a Spark 2.2 project to Spark 2.2 cluster.  With the backward compatibility of Spark 2.2, you can also submit your existing Spark 2.0 and Spark 2.1 projects to a Spark 2.2 cluster.

How to link a cluster Click Link a cluster from Azure Explorer.

Enter Cluster Name, Storage Account, Storage Key, then select a container from Storage Container, at last, input Username and Password.

Please note that you can use either Ambari username, pwd or

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24

Apr

The edge of possibility: best practices for IoT-driven infrastructure transformation

Corporate IT infrastructure has changed a lot in the past decade. From a relatively simple bounded space, with a defined “inside” and “outside,” IT networks have evolved to incorporate a wider range of devices, such as smartphones and tablets, and a growing amount of traffic from additional diverse networks, including the public Internet. However, nothing has the potential to disrupt traditional infrastructure topologies more than the Internet of Things (IoT). This has implications for infrastructure and operations (I&O) teams, as well as developers who are responsible for IoT solutions. A recent Forrester report titled “Edge Computing: IoT Will Spawn A New Infrastructure Market” highlights many of the changes and challenges that must be faced in this rapid evolution. Let’s take a look at a few of the highlights.

Consider the full breadth of devices: The “things” that are connected in IoT require new approaches to development and management, but these endpoints are not the only new hardware you have to consider. Diverse components, including field-located IoT gateways and micro-datacenters, will become part of the networked environments. The need for edge infrastructure will depend on how much latency can be tolerated in the system and the complexity of the operations that

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24

Apr

How Azure Security Center helps detect attacks against your Linux machines

Azure Security Center (ASC) is now extending its Linux threat detection preview program, both on cloud and on-premise. New capabilities include detection of suspicious processes, suspect login attempts, and anomalous kernel module loads. Security Center is using auditd for collecting machines’ events, which is one of the most common frameworks for auditing on Linux. Auditd has the advantage of having been around for a long time and living in the mainline kernel. Any Linux machine that runs auditd by default and is covered by Security Center will benefit from this public preview. For a little more detail on how the collection works, check out our private preview announcement from October.

In addition to building up Linux-specific detections, we have also reviewed applicability of our current detections originally developed for Windows. Attackers also like to be OS-agnostic, especially for large-scale attacks, and will reuse tools and techniques where they can. In such circumstances the same detection is also applicable across operating systems. Happily, several of our analytics worked with minimal tuning. Today, I’ll walk you through an analytic example in the form of malicious crypto coin mining and then give some tips on using Azure Log Analytics with Linux machines.

The

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24

Apr

Storage scenarios for Cray in Azure
Storage scenarios for Cray in Azure

When you get a dedicated Cray supercomputer on your Azure virtual network, you also get attached Cray® ClusterStor™ storage. This is a great solution for the high-performance storage you need while running jobs on the supercomputer. But what happens when the jobs are done? That depends on what you’re planning to do. Azure has a broad portfolio of storage products and solutions.

Post-processing

Many times, you’re using your Cray supercomputer as part of a multi-stage workflow. Using the weather forecasting scenario we wrote about, after the modeling is done, it’s time to generate products. The most familiar setup for most HPC administrators would be to attach Azure Disks to a virtual machine and run a central file server or a fleet of Lustre servers.

But if your post-processing workload can be updated to use object storage, you get another option. Azure Blob Storage our object storage solution. It provides secure, scalable storage for cloud-native workloads. This allows your jobs to run at large scale without having to manage file servers.

Our recent acquisition of Avere Systems will bring another option for high-performance file systems. Avere’s technology will also enable hybrid setups, allowing you to move your data between on-premises and

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24

Apr

Migrating your apps, data and infrastructure to Azure is easier than ever

Cloud computing is fundamentally changing IT and transforming businesses at an unprecedented pace. And, companies are rapidly turning to the cloud for the opportunities it brings – increased agility, faster innovation, and efficient operations, just to name a few.

The question I now most often hear from our customers is not ‘why’ should I move to the cloud, but ‘how’ do I move to the cloud. We’ve worked closely with customers like Chevron and Allscripts, who are transforming their businesses by migrating to Azure. Their experiences, along with many other customers, have confirmed the importance of a vendor who understands the need for a flexible approach to cloud migration.
With new Azure innovation and cost-saving offers, there has never been a better time to move your apps, data and infrastructure to Azure. Here’s why…

Flexible migration options with hybrid support 

Azure gives you a flexible migration path with hybrid consistency across your on-premises assets and the cloud. You don’t have to move everything all at once. Whether your business requires a hybrid state long-term or only during the migration period, Azure is hybrid by design and can support your needs.

For example, Azure Security Center and Azure Active Directory can

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23

Apr

Azure.Source – Volume 28
Azure.Source – Volume 28

Azure Security News at RSA Conference 2018

Last week, we made several Azure Security announcements in conjunction with RSA Conference 2018 in San Francisco:

Introducing Microsoft Azure Sphere: Secure and power the intelligent edge – Microsoft Azure Sphere is a new solution for creating highly-secured, Internet-connected microcontroller (MCU) devices. Azure Sphere includes three components that work together to protect and power devices at the intelligent edge: Azure Sphere certified microcontrollers (MCUs), Azure Sphere OS, and Azure Sphere Security Service.

Microsoft Azure Sphere Leadership Vision – Microsoft product and business leaders introduce Azure Sphere, the latest IoT offering from Microsoft that extends security and new consumer experiences to a whole new class of devices at the intelligent edge.

The 3 ways Azure improves your security – Learn how Azure provides value in three key areas – a secure foundation that is provided by Microsoft, built-in security controls to help you quickly configure security across the full-stack, and unique intelligence at cloud scale to help you safeguard data and respond to threats in real-time. Announcing new Azure Security Center capabilities at RSA 2018 – Azure Security Center provides centralized visibility of the

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23

Apr

Azure IoT Hub SDK officially provides native iOS support

We recently released a port of our Azure IoT Hub C SDK for iOS platform. Whether your iOS project is written in Swift or Objective-C, you can leverage our device SDK and service SDK directly and begin turning your iOS device into an IoT device! Our libraries are available on CocoaPod, a popular package manager for iOS, and the source code is available on GitHub.

iOS devices are traditionally not viewed as IoT devices, but recently, they are getting traction in the IoT space. Here are some of the interesting scenarios we gathered from our industry customers during the preview phase:

iOS device as the gateway for leaf devices or sensors on the factory floor. iOS device in a meeting room, which acts as an end IoT device to send and receive messages from Azure IoT Hub. iOS device to view the visualization of IoT telemetry. iOS device to manage IoT Hub operations.

So, what is in the box? If you have interacted with our Azure IoT Hub C SDK before, this would be familiar to you! Our C SDK is written in C99 for maximum portability to various platforms. The porting process involves writing a thin adoption layer for

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22

Apr

Propel your IoT platform to the cloud with Azure Time Series Insights!

Today we’re pleased to announce two key capabilities that Azure Time Series Insights will be delivering later this year:

A cost-effective long-term storage that enables a cloud-based solution to trend years’ worth of time series data pivoted on devices/tags.  A device-based (also known industry-wide as “tag-based”) user experience backed by a time series model to contextualize raw time series data with device metadata and domain hierarchies.

Additionally, Time Series Insights will be integrating with advanced machine learning and analytics tools like Spark and Jupyter notebooks to help customers tackle time series data challenges in new ways. Data scientists and process engineers in industries like oil & gas, power & utility, manufacturing, and building management rely on time series data solutions for critical tasks like storage, data analysis, and KPI tracking and they’ll be able to do this using Time Series Insights . 

Time series model and tag-centric experience

Time Series Insights’ current user interface is great for data scientists and analysts. However, process engineers and asset operators may not always find this experience natural to use. To address this, we are adding a device-based user experience to the Time Series Insights explorer. This new interface and the underlying time series

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20

Apr

Gartner recognizes Microsoft as a leader in enterprise integration

This blog post was authored by Rodrigo de Carvalho, Product Marketing Manager, Microsoft Azure.

Gartner’s Magic Quadrant for Enterprise Integration Platform as a Service (eiPaaS), 2018 positions Microsoft as a leader and it reflects Microsoft’s ability to execute and completeness of vision.

Microsoft’s global presence, strong growth, and platform versatility provides customers the confidence to choose Azure as the cloud platform to automate, integrate, and optimize their business processes by connecting on-premises applications, SaaS, data, and to API-enable applications with managed integration services.

Integration Platform-as-a-Service at enterprise-scale

By integrating applications and data with partners, suppliers or customers, organizations optimize trade and information exchange driving business agility. Process automation, Enterprise Application Integration (EAI), Business-to-Business (B2B) transactions, Electronic Data Interchange (EDI), and Application Programing Interface (API) management are all areas in which organizations leverage Azure’s integration capabilities.

With Azure, organizations enhance productivity with business processes automation, SaaS, and on-premises application integration leveraging the most common out-of-the-box connectors for Azure services, Office 365, Dynamics CRM, among others.

“To build the highest quality product causing the least amount of harm.”

– Drew Story, Solution Architect, Patagonia

Also, organizations use Azure to optimize the exchange of electronic messages in business-to-business transactions, even

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