Category Archives : Azure Marketplace

16

May

Azure Marketplace new offers – Volume 36
Azure Marketplace new offers – Volume 36

We continue to expand the Azure Marketplace ecosystem. For this volume, 22 new offers successfully met the onboarding criteria and went live. See details of the new offers below:

Applications

Bluefish Editor on Windows Server 2016: Apps4Rent helps you deploy Bluefish Editor on Azure. Bluefish, a free software editor with advanced tools for building dynamic websites, is targeted as a middle path between simple editors and fully integrated development environments.

BOSH Stemcell for Windows Server 2019: This offer from Pivotal Software provides Windows Server 2019-based Stemcell for the Pivotal Cloud Foundry platform.

Corda Opensource VM: R3’s Corda is an open-source blockchain platform that removes costly friction in business transactions by enabling institutions to transact directly using smart contracts and ensures privacy and security.

DataStax Distribution of Apache Cassandra: DataStax offers a simple, cost-effective way to run the Apache Cassandra database in the cloud. DDAC addresses common challenges with adoption, maintenance, and support by streamlining operations and controlling costs.

DataStax Enterprise: DataStax delivers the always-on, active-everywhere, distributed hybrid cloud NoSQL database built on Apache Cassandra. DataStax Enterprise

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06

May

Announcing new Marketplace revenue opportunities

https://azure.microsoft.com/blog/announcing-new-marketplace-revenue-opportunities/

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01

May

Azure Stack IaaS – part seven

https://azure.microsoft.com/blog/azure-stack-iaas-part-seven-2/

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22

Apr

Azure Marketplace new offers – Volume 35
Azure Marketplace new offers – Volume 35

https://azure.microsoft.com/blog/azure-marketplace-new-offers-volume-35-2/

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15

Apr

Deploying Grafana for production deployments on Azure

https://azure.microsoft.com/blog/deploying-grafana-for-production-deployments-on-azure/

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09

Apr

Bitnami Apache Airflow Multi-Tier now available in Azure Marketplace

https://azure.microsoft.com/blog/bitnami-apache-airflow-multi-tier-now-available-in-azure-marketplace/

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28

Mar

Azure Marketplace new offers – Volume 34
Azure Marketplace new offers – Volume 34

We continue to expand the Azure Marketplace ecosystem. From February 16 to February 28, 2019, 50 new offers successfully met the onboarding criteria and went live. See details of the new offers below:

Virtual machines

Analytics Zoo: A unified Analytics + AI platform: Analytics Zoo provides a unified analytics and AI platform that unites Spark, TensorFlow, Keras, and BigDL programs into an integrated pipeline. The pipeline can then transparently scale out to a large Hadoop/Spark cluster.

Blender 3D On Windows Server 2016: Studios around the world use Blender as their go-to 3-D software for remodeling, rendering, animation, video editing, compositing, texturing, and more. Apps4Rent helps you deploy Blender on Microsoft Azure.

 

CIS CentOS 7.5 Benchmark L1: This image of CentOS 7.5 is preconfigured by CIS to the recommendations in the associated CIS Benchmark. CIS Benchmarks are vendor-agnostic, consensus-based security configuration guides.

IBM DB2 Advanced Enterprise Server Edition 11.1: Install IBM DB2 Advanced Enterprise Server Edition in just a few minutes. IBM DB2 is ideal for development, test, and production infrastructure, and MidVision’s RapidDeploy is shipped for streamlined administration.

IBM DB2 Advanced Workgroup Server Edition

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27

Mar

Azure Stack IaaS – part six
Azure Stack IaaS – part six

Pay for what you use

In the virtualization days I used to pad all my requests for virtual machines (VM) to get the largest size possible. Since decisions and requests took time, I would ask for more than I required just so I wouldn’t have delays if I needed more capacity. This resulted in a lot of waste and a term I heard often–VM sprawl.

The behavior is different with Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) VMs in the cloud. A fundamental quality of a cloud is that it provides an elastic pool for your resource to use when needed. Since you only pay for what you use, you don’t need to over provision. Instead, you can optimize capacity based on demand. Let me show you some of the ways you can do this for your IaaS VMs running in Azure and Azure Stack.

Resize

It’s hard to know exactly how big your VM should be. There are so many dimensions to consider, such as CPU, memory, disks, and network. Instead of trying to predict what your VM needs for the next year or even month, why not take a guess, let it run, and then adjust the size once you have some historical

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20

Mar

Azure Stack IaaS – part five

Self-service is core to Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS). Back in the virtualization days, you had to wait for someone to create a VLAN for you, carve out a LUN, and find space on a host. If Microsoft Azure ran that way, we would have needed to hire more and more admins as our cloud business grew.

Do it yourself

A different approach was required, which is why IaaS is important. Azure’s IaaS gives the owner of the subscription everything they need to create virtual machines (VMs) and other resources on their own, without involving an administrator. To learn more visit our documentation, “Introduction to Azure Virtual Machines” and “Introduction to Azure Stack virtual machines.”

Let me give you a few examples that show Azure and Azure Stack self-service management of VMs.

Deployment

Creating a VM is as simple as going through a wizard. You can create the VM by specifying everything needed for the VM in the “Create virtual machine” blade. You can include the operating system image or marketplace template, the size (memory, CPUs, number of disks, and NICs), high availability, storage, networking, monitoring, and even in guest configuration.

Learn more by visiting the following resources:

Deploy Azure Linux VM

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14

Mar

Maximize existing vision systems in quality assurance with Cognitive AI

Quality assurance matters to manufacturers. The reputation and bottom line of a company can be adversely affected if defective products are released. If a defect is not detected, and the flawed product is not removed early in the production process, the damage can run in the hundreds of dollars per unit. To mitigate this, many manufacturers install cameras to monitor their products as they move along the production line. But the data may not always be useful. For example, cameras alone often struggle with identifying defects at high volume of images moving at high speed. Now, a solution provider has developed a way to integrate such existing systems into quality assurance management. Mariner, with its Spyglass solution, uses AI from Azure to achieve visibility over the entire line, and to prevent product defects before they become a problem.

Quality assurance expenses

Quality assurance (QA) management in manufacturing is time-consuming and expensive, but critical. The effects of poor quality are substantial, as they result in:

Re-work costs Production inefficiencies Wasted materials Expensive and embarrassing recalls 

And worst of all, dissatisfied customers that demand returns. 

Multiple variables across multiple facilities

Too many variables make product defect analysis and prediction difficult. Manufacturers need

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