Category Archives : Database

12

Nov

https://azure.microsoft.com/blog/microsoft-azure-tutorial-how-to-integrate-azure-functions-with-mongodb/Special thanks to Graham Neray and the MongoDB team for their contribution to this blog post.  We’re excited to share that teams can now use the global cloud database MongoDB Atlas for free on Microsoft Azure. The newly available free READ MORE

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08

Nov

Static Data Masking for Azure SQL Database and SQL Server
Static Data Masking for Azure SQL Database and SQL Server

The SQL Security team is pleased to share the public preview release of Static Data Masking. Static Data Masking is a data protection feature that helps users sanitize sensitive data in a copy of their SQL databases.  

Use cases

Static Data Masking is designed to help organizations create a sanitized copy of their databases where all sensitive information has been altered in a way that makes the copy sharable with non-production users. Static Data Masking can be used for:

  Development and testing Analytics and business reporting Troubleshooting Sharing the database with a consultant, a research team, or any third-party  

Static Data Masking facilitates compliance with security requirements such as the separation between production and dev/test environments. For organizations subject to GDPR, the feature is a convenient tool to remove all personal information while preserving the structure of the database for further processing.

How Static Data Masking works

With Static Data Masking, the user configures how masking operates for each column selected inside the database. Static Data Masking will then replace data in the database copy with new, masked data generated according to that configuration. Original data cannot be unmasked

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06

Nov

Run your LOB applications with PostgreSQL powered by the plv8 extension

We are extremely excited to share that the plv8 extension for PostgreSQL is now enabled in all generally available regions of Microsoft Azure Database for PostgreSQL. The plv8 extension was one of the highly requested UserVoice asks from our growing customer base and the PostgreSQL community. It is a popular community extension that unlocks new scenarios and possibilities, it also enables developers to write their functions in JavaScript which can be called from SQL.

PostgreSQL is an established open source database with strong native JSON capabilities, and the plv8 extension further enhances it by integrating the JavaScript v8 engine with SQL. Marten library is one such library that uses the plv8 extension to allow developers to leverage PostgreSQL as a NoSQL document store or event store. Using PostgreSQL as a document database opens new possibilities for designing and developing retail cart applications, marketplace solutions, IoT event processing, and LOB applications.

Enterprises, small and medium businesses, as well as ISVs can now accelerate the development and deployments of their LOB applications on the managed Azure Database for PostgreSQL service. This helps shorten the time to market.

Let us see an example of how one can use the plv8 extension with Azure

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05

Nov

Best practices for alerting on metrics with Azure Database for PostgreSQL monitoring

Whether you are a developer, database administrator, site reliability engineer, or a DevOps professional, monitoring databases is an important part of maintaining the reliability, availability, and performance of your PostgreSQL server. There are various metrics available for you in Microsoft Azure Database for PostgreSQL to get insights on the behavior of the server. You can also set alerts on these metrics using the Azure portal or Azure CLI.

With modern applications evolving from a traditional on-premises approach to becoming more hybrid or cloud-native, there is also a need to adopt some best practices for a successful monitoring strategy on a hybrid and public cloud. Here are some example best practices for using monitoring data on your PostgreSQL server, and areas you can consider improving based on these various metrics.

Active connections

Sample threshold (percentage or value): 80 percent of total connection limit for greater than or equal to 30 minutes, checked every five minutes.

Things to check: If you notice that active connections are at 80 percent of the total limit for the past half hour, verify if this is expected based on the workload. If you think the load is expected, active connections limit can be increased by

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05

Nov

Best practices for alerting on metrics with Azure Database for MySQL monitoring

Whether you are a developer, database administrator, site reliability engineer, or a DevOps professional, monitoring databases is an important part of maintaining the reliability, availability, and performance of your PostgreSQL server. There are various metrics available for you in Microsoft Azure Database for MySQL to get insights on the behavior of the server. You can also set alerts on these metrics using the Azure portal or Azure CLI.

With modern applications evolving from a traditional on-premises approach to becoming more hybrid or cloud-native, there is also a need to adopt some best practices for a successful monitoring strategy on a hybrid and public cloud. Here are some example best practices on how you can use monitoring data on your MySQL server, and areas you can consider improving based on these various metrics.

Active connections

Sample threshold (percentage or value): 80 percent of total connection limit for greater than or equal to 30 minutes, checked every five minutes.

Things to check: If you notice that active connections are at 80 percent of the total limit for the past half hour, verify if this is expected based on the workload. If you think the load is expected, active connections limit can

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01

Nov

Azure Cosmos DB – A polymorphic database for an expanding data universe

There is a discussion that occurs frequently in the data world today, which centers around comparisons between traditional databases that are based on relational theory e.g. Oracle or SQL Server and a more modern wave of platforms commonly referred to as “NoSQL” databases. Proponents from both types of databases tend to get into disputes concerning, “which database is best?” However, this can be a misguided point of contention. To understand why, it can help to trace back through history, and reflect on how NoSQL databases first rose to prominence.

In the past 15 years, database technology has radically expanded beyond what could be described, to use a physics analogy, as a singularity in the initial conditions of our data universe: transactional processing using relational databases. This expansion has grown with improved technology and adoption, fueled by demand for the capability to process more data, as well as different kinds of data. There has been a revolution in the exchange of data, precipitated by the social media and mobile age. This has given rise to the increased popularity of different transient, flexible storage mediums, and protocols such as XML and JSON. While these became de facto standards in various forms of

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31

Oct

Automate your Azure Database for MySQL deployments using ARM templates

This blog is authored by Parikshit Savjani, Senior Program Manager, Microsoft Azure 

The Azure Database for MySQL REST API enables DevOps engineers to automate and integrate provisioning while configuring and operating managed MySQL servers and databases in Azure. The API allows the creation, enumeration, management, and deletion of MySQL servers and databases on the Azure Database for MySQL service.

Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates leverage the underlying REST API to declare and program the Azure resources required for deployments at scale, aligning with infrastructure as a code concept. The template parameterizes the Azure resource name, SKU, network, firewall configuration, and settings, allowing it to be created one time and used multiple times. ARM templates can be easily created using the Azure portal or Visual Studio Code. They enable application packaging, standardization, and deployment automation, which can be integrated into the DevOps CI/CD pipeline. For instance, if you are looking to quickly deploy a web app with Azure Database for MySQL database, you can perform the end-to-end deployment using our Azure QuickStart template from the GitHub gallery.

You can learn more in our documentation about JSON template reference for an Azure Database for MySQL server.

If you are looking to build

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29

Oct

Design patterns – IoT and aggregation
Design patterns – IoT and aggregation

In this article, you will learn how to insert IoT data with high throughput and then use aggregations in different fields for reporting. To understand this design pattern, you should already be familiar with Azure Cosmos DB and have a good understanding of change feed, request unit (RU), and Azure Functions. If these are new concepts for you, please follow the links above to learn about them.

Many databases achieve extremely high throughput and low latency because they partition the data. This is true for all NoSQL database engines like MongoDB, HBase, Cassandra, or Azure Cosmos DB. All these databases can scale out unlimitedly because of partitioning or sharding.

Let us look at Azure Cosmos DB more closely. On the top level, a container is defined. You can think of container as a table, a collection, or a graph but this is the main entity which holds all the information. Azure Cosmos DB uses the word “container” to define this top-level entity, and because Azure Cosmos DB is a multi-model database this container is synonymous with collections for SQL, MongoDB, and Graph APIs, and Tables for Cassandra or Table APIs.

A collection has many physical partitions which are allocated based

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25

Oct

Azure Cosmos DB partitioning design patterns – Part 1
Azure Cosmos DB partitioning design patterns – Part 1

In this article, you will learn how to use partition keys to efficiently distribute data, improve application performance, and enable faster look-up. The pre-requisites of this article are general knowledge of Azure Cosmos DB and a good understanding of change feed, request unit (RU), and Azure Functions.

Imagine you have data which you would like to insert with high throughput and query on two or more different keys. In this scenario, suppose you work for an airline company and need to store user reservation information in a collection. User data is defined as:

{ UserId: user@email.com, FirstName: John, LastName: Doe, PNR: 2345423, CityOfOrigin: Seattle, CityOfDestination: London, DOB: 12.2.76, other details …. }

Out of many possible values, you choose “UserId” (user email address) as the partition key. This is a good choice for a partition key because “UserId” is unique for every user, ensuring your data remains well distributed. Your data is distributed evenly among all partitions, as shown in Figure 1. However, when you are querying the data you do not always have a “UserId”. Sometimes you want to query the data by user last name or user Passenger Name Record (PNR) number.

Figure 1: Data distributed

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04

Oct

Announcing Azure database services for MySQL and PostgreSQL for Azure Government customers

Today, we are excited to announce the general availability (GA) of Azure Database for MySQL and Azure Database for PostgreSQL for Azure Government customers. With this GA milestone, government agencies and their partners have even more options as they work to advance their missions. These fully managed, government-ready database as a service offerings bring the community versions of MySQL and PostgreSQL to mission-critical government workloads with built-in high availability, a 99.99% availability SLA, elastic scaling for performance, and industry leading security and compliance. Building on the community edition of MySQL and PostgreSQL, lifting and shifting to the cloud is easier than ever, while maintaining full compatibility with your languages and frameworks of your choice.

Features include compute scale up to 32 vCores, offering a new Memory Optimized tier, ability to scale storage on-line independent of compute without impact to application performance, allowing greater flexibility in backup storage options, and achieving industry compliance with ISO, SOC, and HIPAA. We are also compliant with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). As with every Azure Government service, you also get the assurance of world-class security, compliance and advanced threat protection services.

The Azure Government difference

Azure Government delivers a dedicated cloud enabling government

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