Category Archives : Database

20

Mar

Microsoft’s Azure Cosmos DB is named a leader in the Forrester Wave: Big Data NoSQL

We’re excited to announce that Forrester has named Microsoft as a Leader in The Forrester Wave™: Big Data NoSQL, Q1 2019 based on their evaluation of Azure Cosmos DB. We believe Forrester’s findings validate the exceptional market momentum of Azure Cosmos DB and how happy our customers are with the product.

NoSQL platforms are on the rise

According to Forrester, “half of global data and analytics technology decision makers have either implemented or are implementing NoSQL platforms, taking advantage of the benefits of a flexible database that serves a broad range of use cases…While many organizations are complementing their relational databases with NoSQL, some have started to replace them to support improved performance, scale, and lower their database costs.”

Azure Cosmos DB has market momentum

Azure Cosmos DB is Microsoft’s globally distributed, multi-model database service for mission-critical workloads. Azure Cosmos DB provides turnkey global distribution with unlimited endpoint scalability, elastic scaling of throughput (at multiple granularities, e.g., database, key-space, tables and collections) and storage worldwide, single-digit millisecond latencies at the 99th percentile, five well-defined consistency models, and guaranteed high availability, all backed by the industry-leading comprehensive SLAs. Azure Cosmos DB automatically indexes all data without requiring developers to

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19

Mar

Securely monitoring your Azure Database for PostgreSQL Query Store

A few months ago, I shared best practices for alerting on metrics with Azure Database for PostgreSQL. Though I was able to cover how to monitor certain key metrics on Azure Database for PostgreSQL, I did not cover how to monitor and alert on the performance of queries that your application is heavily relying on. As a PostgreSQL database, from time to time you will need to investigate if there are any queries running indefinitely on a PostgreSQL database. These long running queries may interfere with the overall database performance and likely get stuck on some background process. This blog post covers how you can set up alerting on query performance related metrics using Azure Functions and Azure Key Vault.

What is Query Store?

Query Store was a feature in Azure Database for PostgreSQL announced in early Fall 2018 that seamlessly enables tracking query performance over time. This simplifies performance troubleshooting by helping you quickly find the longest running and most resource-intensive queries. Learn how you can use Query Store on a wide variety of scenarios by visiting our documentation, “Usage scenarios for Query Store.” Query Store, when enabled, automatically captures a history of query runtime and wait statistics. It

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18

Mar

Power IoT and time-series workloads with TimescaleDB for Azure Database for PostgreSQL

We’re excited to announce a partnership with Timescale that introduces support for TimescaleDB on Azure Database for PostgreSQL for customers building IoT and time-series workloads. TimescaleDB has a proven track record of being deployed in production in a variety of industries including oil & gas, financial services, and manufacturing. The partnership reinforces our commitment to supporting the open-source community to provide our users with the most innovative technologies PostgreSQL has to offer.

TimescaleDB allows you to scale for fast ingest and complex queries while natively supporting full SQL. It leverages PostgreSQL as an essential building block, which means that users get the familiarity and reliability of PostgreSQL, along with the scalability and performance of TimescaleDB. Enabling TimescaleDB on your new or existing Azure Database for PostgreSQL server will eliminate the need to run two databases to collect relational and time-series data.

How to get started

If you don’t already have an Azure Database for PostgreSQL server, you can create one with the Azure CLI command az postgres up. Next, run the following command to add TimescaleDB to your Postgres libraries:

az postgres server configuration set –resource-group mygroup –server-name myserver –name shared_preload_libraries –value timescaledb

Restart the server to load the

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14

Mar

Microsoft Azure portal March 2019 update
Microsoft Azure portal March 2019 update

This month’s updates include an improved “All services” view, Virtual Network Gateway overview updates, an improved DNS Zone and Load Balancer creation experience, Management Group integration into Activity Log, redesigned overview screens for certain services within Azure DB, an improved creation experience for Azure SQL Database, multiple changes to the Security Center, and more updates to Intune.

Sign in to the Azure portal now and see for yourself everything that’s new. Download the Azure mobile app to stay connected to your Azure resources anytime, anywhere.

Here’s the list of March updates to the Azure portal: Shell Improved “All services” view IaaS Virtual network gateway overview updates New full-screen DNS zone and Load Balancer create blades Management experiences Management Group integration into Activity Log SQL Redesigned overview blade for Azure Database for MySQL, PostgreSQL, and MariaDB services Improved creation experience for Azure SQL Database Azure Security Center Secure score added as a dashboard KPI New regulatory compliance dashboard Updated security policies Updated security recommendations Other Updates to Microsoft Intune Shell

Improved “All services” view

We have improved the “All services” view, the view that shows all available services and resources in Azure:

The entire screen’s real estate is now utilized to

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14

Mar

Now available for preview: Workload importance for Azure SQL Data Warehouse

Azure SQL Data Warehouse is a fast, flexible and secure analytics platform for enterprises of all sizes. Today we are announcing the preview availability of workload importance on the Gen2 platform to help customers manage resources more efficiently. Workload importance gives data engineers the ability to use importance to classify requests. Requests with higher importance are guaranteed quicker access to resources which helps meet SLAs.

“More with less” is often the motto when it comes to operating data warehousing solutions. The ability to easily scale up compute resources gives data engineers tremendous flexibility. However, when there is budget pressure and scaling down is required, problems can arise.  Workload importance allows high business value work to meet SLAs in a shared environment with fewer resources.

An example of workload importance is shown below. The CEO’s request was submitted last and classified with high importance. Because the CEO’s request has high importance, it is granted access to resources before the Analyst requests allowing it to complete sooner.

Get started now classifying requests with importance

Classifying requests is done with the new CREATE WORKLOAD CLASSIFIER syntax. Below is an example that maps the login for the ExecutiveReports role to ABOVE_NORMAL importance and

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12

Mar

Stay informed about service issues with Azure Service Health

When your Azure resources go down, one of your first questions is probably, “Is it me or is it Azure?” Azure Service Health helps you stay informed and take action when Azure service issues like incidents and planned maintenance affect you by providing a personalized health dashboard, customizable alerts, and expert guidance.

In this blog, we’ll cover how you can use Azure Service Health’s personalized dashboard to stay informed about issues that could affect you now or in the future.

Monitor Azure service issues and take action to mitigate downtime

You may already be familiar with the Azure status page, a global view of the health of all Azure services across all Azure regions. It’s a good reference for major incidents with widespread impact, but we recommend using Azure Service Health to stay informed about Azure incidents and maintenance. Azure Service Health only shows issues that affect you, provides information about all incidents and maintenance, and has richer capabilities like alerting, shareable updates and RCAs, and other guidance and support.

Azure Service Health tracks three types of health events that may impact you:

Service issues: Problems in Azure services that affect you right now. Planned maintenance: Upcoming maintenance that

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04

Mar

Secure server access with VNet service endpoints for Azure Database for MariaDB

This blog post was co-authored by Sumeet Mittal, Senior Program Manager, Azure Networking.

Ensure security and limit access to your MariaDB server with the virtual network (VNet) service endpoints now generally available for Azure Database for MariaDB. VNet service endpoints enable you to isolate connectivity to your logical server from a given subnet within your virtual network. The traffic to Azure Database for MariaDB from your VNet always stays within the Azure network. Preference for this direct route is over any specific ones that route Internet traffic through virtual appliances or on-premises.

There is no additional billing for virtual network access through VNet service endpoints. The current pricing model for Azure Database for MariaDB applies as is.

Using firewall rules and VNet service endpoints together

Turning on VNet service endpoints does not override firewall rules that you have provisioned on your Azure Database for MariaDB, both remain applicable.

VNet service endpoints don’t extend to on-premises. To allow access from on-premises, you can use firewall rules to limit connectivity only to your public (NAT) IPs.

To learn more about VNet protection view our documentation, “Use Virtual Network service endpoints and rules for Azure Database for MariDB.”

Turning on service endpoints

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04

Mar

Scaling out read workloads in Azure Database for MySQL

For read-heavy workloads that you are looking to scale out, you can use read replicas, which are now generally available to all Azure Database for MySQL users. Read replicas make it easy to horizontally scale out beyond a single database server. This is useful in workloads such as BI reporting and web applications, which tend to have more read operations than write.

The feature supports continuous asynchronous replication of data from one Azure Database for MySQL server (the “master” server) to up to five Azure Database for MySQL servers (the “read replica” servers) in the same region. Read-heavy workloads can be distributed across the replica servers according to your preference. Replica servers are read-only except for writes replicated from data changes on the master.

What’s supported with read replicas?

You can create or delete replica servers based on your workload’s needs. A master server can support up to five replica servers within the same Azure region. Stopping replication to any replica server makes it a standalone read-write server.

You can easily manage your replica servers using the Azure portal and Azure CLI.

From the Azure portal:

Use Azure Monitor to track replication with the “replication lag in seconds” metric:

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28

Feb

Creating IoT applications with Azure Database for PostgreSQL
Creating IoT applications with Azure Database for PostgreSQL

There are numerous IoT use cases in different industries, with common categories like predictive maintenance, connected vehicles, anomaly detection, asset monitoring, and many others. For example, in water treatment facilities in the state of California, IoT devices can be installed in water pumps to measure horse power, flow rate, and electric usage of the water pumps. The events emitted from these devices get sent to an IoT hub every 30 seconds for aggregation and processing. A water treatment facility company could build a dashboard to monitor the water pumps and build notifications to alert the maintenance team when the event data is beyond a certain threshold. They could then alert the maintenance team to repair the water pump if the flow rate is dangerously low. This is a very typical proactive maintenance IoT use case.

Azure IoT is a complete stack of IoT solutions. It’s a collection of Microsoft managed cloud services that connect, monitor, and control billions of IoT assets. The common set of components in the Azure IoT core subsystem include:

IoT devices that stream the events Cloud gateway, where Azure IoT is most often used to enable communication to and from devices and edge devices Stream processing

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20

Feb

Use GraphQL with Hasura and Azure Database for PostgreSQL
Use GraphQL with Hasura and Azure Database for PostgreSQL

Azure Database for PostgreSQL provides a fully managed, enterprise-ready community PostgreSQL database as a service. The PostgreSQL community edition helps you easily migrate existing apps to the cloud or develop cloud-native applications, using languages and frameworks of your choice. The service offers industry leading innovations such as built-in high availability, backed with 99.99 percent SLA, without the need to set up replicas and enabling customers to save over two times the cost. The capability also allows customers to scale compute up or down in seconds, helping you easily adjust to changes in workload demands.

Additionally, built-in intelligent features such as Query Performance Insight and performance recommendations help customers further lower their total cost of ownership (TCO) by providing customized recommendations and insights to optimize the performance of their Postgres databases. These benefits coupled with unparalleled security and compliance, Microsoft Azure’s industry leading global reach, and Azure IP Advantage, empower customers to focus on their business and applications rather than the database.

As part of the broader Postgres community, our aim is to contribute to and partner with others in the community to bring new features to Azure Database for PostgreSQL users. You can now take advantage of the Hasura GraphQL

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