Category Archives : Developer

24

May

New capabilities to enable robust GDPR compliance
New capabilities to enable robust GDPR compliance

Today marks the beginning of enforcement of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), and I’m pleased to announce that we have released an unmatched array of new features and resources to help support compliance with the GDPR and the policy needs of Azure customers.

New offerings include the general availability of the Azure GDPR Data Subject Request (DSR) portal, Azure Policy, Compliance Manager for GDPR, Data Log Export, and the Azure Security and Compliance Blueprint for GDPR.

In our webcast today, President Brad Smith outlined our commitment to making sure that our products and services comply with the GDPR, including having more than 1,600 engineers across the company working on GDPR projects. As Brad noted, we believe privacy is a fundamental human right, and that individuals must be in control of their data. So I am pleased that Azure is part of keeping that commitment by being the only hyperscale cloud provider to offer the level of streamlined mechanisms and tools for GDPR compliance enforcement we are announcing today.

Azure Data Subject Request (DSR) portal enables you to fulfill GDPR requests. The DSR capability is generally available today through the Azure portal user interface, as well as through pre-existing

24

May

Explore Build 2018 content with playlists
Explore Build 2018 content with playlists

If you couldn’t attend Microsoft Build 2018, now is your opportunity to do so online with Microsoft Build Live 2018. Learn about the cloud, AI, IoT, and much more. But as you browse the hundreds of recordings available, you may find it overwhelming to find the things that are the most relevant to what you want to learn. That’s why we organized select content into playlists.

Playlist: Migrate existing apps to the cloud

Simply select the playlist that is most interesting to you, and you’ll get our top picks for the most relevant sessions, resources, and expert interviews:

Migrate existing apps to the cloud – Learn the best strategy and which tools to use for migrating your infrastructure and applications to Azure. Extend existing apps with cloud services – Learn how to take your applications to the next level by using your current skills to use Azure services and let Azure do the heavy lifting for you. Learn to build cloud-native apps – Learn how easy it is to create a cloud-native application in Azure that is intelligent, performant, highly-available, and cost-effective. Add intelligence to apps using machine learning and AI – Learn how to use the power of

24

May

Devs imagine, create, and code the future at Microsoft Build

On Monday, May 7, more than 6,000 developers from more than 70 countries descended on the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle, Washington, for Microsoft Build. From experienced coders to eight-year-old prodigies, the attendees were united by a passion for building apps for the intelligent cloud. To catch up on sessions you missed, check out the on-demand content.

CEO Satya Nadella kicked things off by talking about how the intelligent cloud will revolutionize every aspect of our lives. Alongside Executive Vice President for Cloud and Enterprise Group Scott Guthrie and Corporate Vice President for Windows Joe Belfiore, Nadella showed developers how they can use Microsoft Azure and Microsoft 365 to create transformational multisense and multidevice experiences.

In one keynote demonstration, attendees got to see how an audio-video device using Microsoft 365 and AI services could transform a common business meeting. Through the use of facial recognition, each attendee was greeted by name as they entered the room. The device even transcribed their speech in real-time, automatically assigning the text to the right speaker. Power BI was used to visualize data. Cortana, together with Microsoft Graph, created a summary of action items, automatically attaching the files that were mentioned.

23

May

Create enterprise subscription experience in Azure portal public preview

Typically, Azure Enterprise Agreement (EA) subscriptions were created in the EA Portal and management of services was completed in the Azure portal. Our goal is to converge on the Azure portal as the primary avenue for users to manage their Azure services and subscriptions.

We are making available the public preview of the create subscription experience in the Azure portal. This capability will directly align with the the ability to create multiple enterprise subscriptions using the Create Subscription API. This experience is fully integrated in the Azure portal and will enable you to quickly get an EA subscription created without any programming.

Getting started

The following steps only apply to EA and EA Dev/Test subscriptions. The majority of users will be able to access the user experience below. There will be some users who do not meet the prerequisites to create a subscription in the Azure portal. For those users, the “+Add” button will open a separate window to create new subscriptions.

The steps for using the create enterprise subscription experience in the Azure portal are as follows:

If you are not an account owner, get added by an EA enrollment admin. Navigate to the Subscriptions extension in the Azure

23

May

Serverless real-time notifications in Azure using Azure #CosmosDB

There were lots of announcements at the Microsoft Build 2018 conference, but one that caught my eye was the preview release of Azure SignalR, a Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) offering that lets you implement real-time messages and notifications quite easily, without worrying about instances or hosts.

So it made me wonder, could I build something using my favorite globally-distributed and serverless database, Azure Cosmos DB, and Azure’s serverless compute offering, Azure Functions? It turns out others were interested in this topic too.

Real-time, really?

For those of you that do not know, SignalR is a library that’s been around since 2013 for the ASP.NET Framework, recently rewritten for ASP.NET Core under the name of SignalR Core, that allows you to easily create real-time applications and push content to clients through the Websocket protocol, gracefully falling back to other alternatives depending on the client. It works great for games, dashboards/monitoring apps, collaborative apps, mapping/tracking apps, or any app requiring notifications.

By leveraging the Websocket protocol, content can be pushed to clients without the overhead of opening multiple HTTP connections and over a single two-way TCP channel that is maintained for the entire session.

Going serverless!

One requirement of SignalR was that you,

22

May

Blue-Green deployments using Azure Traffic Manager

Azure Traffic Manager, Azure’s DNS based load balancing solution, is used by customers for a wide variety of use cases including routing a global user base to endpoints on Azure that will give them the fastest, low latency experience, providing seamless auto-failover for mission critical workloads and migration from on-premises to the cloud. One key use case where customers leverage Traffic Manager is to make their software deployments smoother with minimal impact to their users by implementing a Blue-Green deployment process using Traffic Manager’s weighted round-robin routing method. This blog will show how we can implement Blue-Green deployment using Traffic Manager, but before we dive deep, let us discuss what we mean by Blue-Green deployment.

Blue-Green deployment is a software rollout method that can reduce the impact of interruptions caused due to issues in the new version being deployed. This is achieved by exposing the new version of the software to a limited set of users and expanding that user base gradually until everyone is using the new version. If at any time the new version is causing issues, for example a broken authentication workflow in the new version of a web application, all the users can be instantly* redirected

18

May

Azure the cloud for all – highlights from Microsoft BUILD 2018

Last week, the Microsoft Build conference brought developers lots of innovation and was action packed with in-depth sessions. During the event, my discussions in the halls ranged from containers to dev tools, IoT to Azure Cosmos DB, and of course, AI. The pace of innovation available to developers is amazing. And, in case there was simply too much for you to digest, I wanted to pull together some key highlights and top sessions to watch, starting with a great video playlist with highlights from the keynotes.

Empowering developers through the best tools

Build is for devs, and all innovation in our industry starts with code! So, let’s start with dev tools. Day one of Build marked the introduction of .NET Core 2.1 release candidate. .NET Core 2.1 improves on previous releases with performance gains and many new features. Check out all the details in the release blog and this great session from Build showing what you can use today:

.NET Overview & Roadmap: In this session, Scott Hanselman and Scott Hunter talked about all things .NET, including new .NET Core 2.1 features made available at Build.

Scott Hanselman and Scott Hunter sharing new .NET Core 2.1.

With AI being top

17

May

Detect malicious activity using Azure Security Center and Azure Log Analytics

This blog post was authored by the Azure Security Center team. ​

We have heard from our customers that investigating malicious activity on their systems can be tedious and knowing where to start is challenging. Azure Security Center makes it simple for you to respond to detected threats. It uses built-in behavioral analytics and machine learning to detect threats and generates alerts for the attempted or successful attacks. As discussed in a previous post, you can explore the alerts of detected threats through the Investigation Path, which uses Azure Log Analytics to show the relationship between all the entities involved in the attack. Today, we are going to explain to you how Security Center’s ability to detect threats using machine learning and Azure Log Analytics can help you keep pace with rapidly evolving cyberattacks.

Investigate anomalies on your systems using Azure Log Analytics

One method is to look at the trends of processes, accounts, and computers to understand when anomalous or rare processes and accounts are run on computers which indicates potentially malicious or unwanted activity. Run the below query against your data and note that what comes up is an anomaly or rare over the last 30 days. This

15

May

Why developers should enable Azure Security Center’s Just-in-Time VM Access

We are seeing more developers building and running their applications in the public cloud. In fact, companies are using multiple public clouds to run their applications. Our customers tell us that they choose to build applications in Azure because it’s easy to get started and that they have peace of mind knowing the services that their applications rely on will be available, reliable, and secure. Today, we are going to discuss how Azure Security Center’s Just-in-Time VM Access can help you secure virtual machines that are running your applications and code. 

Successful attacks on your virtual machines can create serious challenges for development. If a server is compromised, your source code could potentially be exposed, along with the proprietary algorithms or internal knowledge about the application. The pace of development can slow down because your team is focused on recovering from the attack instead of writing and reviewing code. Most importantly, an attack can affect your customers’ abilities to access your applications, impacting your brand and your business. Just-in-Time VM Access can help you reduce your exposure to attacks by limiting the amount of time management ports are open on the virtual machines running your code.

Just-in-Time VM Access

14

May

Using the Azure IoT Python SDK: make sure you check the version!

Since the release in 2016, developers are using our Azure IoT Python SDK to write device and back-end applications to connect to Azure IoT Hub and Device Provisioning Service, as well as writing modules for Azure IoT Edge (preview). Python is a popular choice for prototyping, and it is gaining traction in the embedded world.

If you decide to use the Python SDK for development, there are few things you should keep in mind: Python SDK is a wrapper on top of our Azure IoT C SDK, and we release binary packages on pip for Windows, Ubuntu, and Raspbian, all of which are compatible with Python 2 and Python 3. This approach has its ups and downs. On the upside, the features you see in C are available in Python with no functionality difference. On the downside, it is not a native Python SDK. Application Programming Interfaces (APIs) that we exposed may look different from typical Python APIs; and as a developer, you will need to pay attention the architecture of underlying platform, especially when you are using pip!

At a high level, there are three things that must align to reference the Python SDK properly: Python version (2 or