Category Archives : Developer

07

Nov

Sharing the DevOps journey at Microsoft
Sharing the DevOps journey at Microsoft

Today, more and more organizations are focused on delivering new digital solutions to customers and finding that the need for increased agility, improved processes, and collaboration between development and operation teams is becoming business-critical. For over a decade, DevOps has been the answer to these challenges. Understanding the need for DevOps is one thing, but the actual adoption of DevOps in the real world is a whole other challenge. How can an organization with multiple teams and projects, with deeply rooted existing processes, and with considerable legacy software change its ways and embrace DevOps?

At Microsoft, we know something about these challenges. As a company that has been building software for decades, Microsoft consists of thousands of engineers around the world that deliver many different products. From Office, to Azure, to Xbox we also found we needed to adapt to a new way of delivering software. The new era of the cloud unlocks tremendous potential for innovation to meet our customers’ growing demand for richer and better experiences—while our competition is not slowing down. The need to accelerate innovation and to transform how we work is real and urgent.

The road to transformation is not easy and we believe that

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07

Nov

10 user experience updates to the Azure portal

https://azure.microsoft.com/blog/10-user-experience-updates-to-the-azure-portal/We’re constantly working to improve your user experience in the Azure portal. Our goal is to offer you a productive and easy-to-use single-pane-of glass where you can build, manage, and monitor your Azure services, applications, and infrastructure. In this post, READ MORE

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06

Nov

Secure and compliant APIs for a hybrid and multi-cloud world

APIs are everywhere. The broad proliferation of applications throughout enterprises often results in large silos of opaque processes and services, making it hard for IT to manage and govern APIs in a systematic way, and for development teams to gain visibility into and make use of APIs that already exist.

Entire industries, such as financial services, are embracing APIs as a means to become more open, for example with open banking initiatives. Open banking is an API-first approach to creating more open, rich ecosystems that encourage third-party participation and usage of the services financial institutions have previously kept behind the scenes.

Products, such as Azure API Management, were created to address these issues. By letting you manage all APIs in a single, centralized location, you are able to impose authentication, authorization, throttling, and transformation policies and easily monitor the usage of the APIs associated with your applications, giving you the much-needed visibility into your application portfolio(s) at a macro-level.

To succeed in an increasingly connected world, it is key to adopt an API-first approach that lets you:

Embrace innovation by creating vibrant API ecosystems. Secure and manage APIs seamlessly in a hybrid world.

APIs can be a bridge to the

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24

Oct

Leverage Azure premium file shares for high availability of data

This post was co-authored by Mike Emard Principal Program Manager, Azure Storage. 

SQL Server on Azure virtual machines brings cloud agility, elasticity, and scalability benefits to SQL Server workloads. SQL virtual machine offers full control on the operating system, virtual machine size, storage subsystem, and the level of manageability needed for your workload. Preconfigured SQL Server image from Azure Marketplace comes with free SQL Server manageability benefits like Automated Backup and Automated Patching. If you choose to self-install SQL Server on Azure virtual machines then you can register with SQL virtual machine resource provider to get all the benefits available to SQL marketplace images and simplified license management.

Microsoft provides an availability SLA of 99.95 percent that covers just the virtual machine not SQL Server. For SQL Server high availability on Azure virtual machines, you should host at least two virtual machine instances in an availability set (for availability at 99.95 percent) or different availability zones (for availability at 99.99 percent) and configure a high availability feature for SQL Server, such as Always On availability groups or failover cluster instance.

Today, we are announcing a new option for SQL Server high availability with SQL Server failover cluster with Azure premium file shares. Premium file shares are solid-state drive backed consistent

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21

Oct

October 2019 unified Azure SDK preview
October 2019 unified Azure SDK preview

Welcome back to another release of the unified Azure Data client libraries. For the most part, the API surface areas of the SDKs have been stabilized based on your feedback. Thank you to everyone who has been submitting issues on GitHub and keep the feedback coming.

Please grab the October preview libraries and try them out—throw demanding performance scenarios at them, integrate them with other services, try to debug an issue, or generally build your scenario and let us know what you find.

Our goal is to release these libraries before the end of the year but we are driven by quality and feedback and your participation is key.

Getting started

As we did for the last three releases, we have created four pages that unify all the key information you need to get started and give feedback. You can find them here:

.NET Java JavaScript and TypeScript Python

For those of you who want to dive deep into the content, the release notes linked above and the changelogs they point to give more details on what has changed. Here we are calling out a few high-level items.

APIs locking down

The surface area for Azure Key Vault and Storage

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20

Oct

Azure API for FHIR® moves to general availability

Today, Microsoft becomes the first cloud with a fully managed, first-party service to ingest, persist, and manage healthcare data in the native FHIR format. The Azure API for FHIR® is releasing today in generally availability to all Azure customers.

The core mission in healthcare is to deliver better health outcomes, and the data standard fueling the future of that mission is FHIR. The Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resource (FHIR) has revolutionized the industry in the last several years and is rapidly becoming established as the preferred standard for exchanging and managing healthcare information in electronic format.  Microsoft understands the unique value FHIR offers to enable management of Protected Health Information (PHI) in the cloud, so we’re advancing Azure technology to enable our health customers the ability to ingest, manage, and persist PHI data across the Azure environment in the native FHIR format.

With the Azure API for FHIR, a developer, researcher, device maker, or anyone working with health data—is empowered with a turnkey platform to provision a cloud-based FHIR service in just minutes and begin securely managing PHI data in Azure. We’ve simplified FHIR through this new Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) so customers can free up their operational resources and focus their development

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14

Oct

Azure Monitor adds Worker Service SDK, new ASP.NET core metrics

Application Insights from Azure Monitor empowers developers and IT professionals to observe, debug, diagnose, and improve their distributed services hosted on the cloud, on-premises, and through hybrid solutions.

The release of the Application Insights for ASP.NET Core 2.8.0 for web applications and the Application Insights for .NET Core Worker Service 2.8.0 for non-web applications delivers new value to developers including:

Support for more applications types. New alertable metrics. Support for ASP.NET Core 3.0. Cross-vendor distributed tracing. Support for more application types

The Application Insights Worker Service SDK supports the new ASP.NET Core 3.0 Worker Service template, and customer engagement on GitHub helped us prioritize this work. Beyond .NET Core Worker Service Applications, this SDK brings the full power of Application Insights to other non-web applications including Console Applications, Queue Processing, and Background Jobs. Get started with our step-by-step onboarding guide.

New alertable metrics

Event Counters allow you to observe and alert on new metrics including Time in Garbage Collection, Allocation Rate, and Thread Pool Queue Length. Event Counters expand the historical Windows Performance Counters to be cross-platform—Linux, MacOS, and Windows. Application Insights now collects these metrics out-of-the-box, making them easily observable and alertable.

Additionally, you can now observe CPU usage on Linux, MacOS, and Windows

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14

Oct

Azure SQL Database: Continuous innovation and limitless scale at an unbeatable price

More companies are choosing Azure for their SQL workloads, and it is easy to see why. Azure SQL Database is evergreen, meaning it does not need to be patched or upgraded, and it has a strong track record of innovation and reliability for mission-critical workloads. But, in addition to delivering unparalleled innovation, it is also important to provide customers with the best price-performance. Here, once again, SQL Database comes out on top.

SQL Database leads in price-performance for mission-critical workloads

GigaOm, an independent research firm, recently published a study where they tested throughput performance between Azure SQL Database and SQL Server on AWS RDS. SQL Database emerged as the price-performance leader for mission-critical workloads while costing up to 86 percent less than AWS RDS.1

The image above is a price-performance comparison from the GigaOm report. The price-performance metric is price divided by throughput (transactions per second, tps). Lower is better.

Customers like H&R Block found it easy to extend their on-premises experience to Azure, where they tapped into new levels of performance, scalability, and flexibility.

“SQL Database managed instance gives us a smooth migration path for moving existing workloads to Azure with minimal technical reengineering. All the applications

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30

Sep

Built-in Jupyter notebooks in Azure Cosmos DB are now available

Earlier this year, we announced a preview of built-in Jupyter notebooks for Azure Cosmos DB. These notebooks, running inside Azure Cosmos DB, are now available.

Cosmic notebooks are available for all data models and APIs including Cassandra, MongoDB, SQL (Core), Gremlin, and Spark to enhance the developer experience in Azure Cosmos DB. These notebooks are directly integrated into the Azure Portal and your Cosmos accounts, making them convenient and easy to use. Developers, data scientists, engineers and analysts can use the familiar Jupyter notebooks experience to:

Interactively run queries Explore and analyze data Visualize data Build, train, and run machine learning and AI models

In this blog post, we’ll explore how notebooks make it easy for you to work with and visualize your Azure Cosmos DB data.

Easily query your data

With notebooks, we’ve included built-in commands to make it easy to query your data for ad-hoc or exploratory analysis. From the Portal, you can use the %%sql magic command to run a SQL query against any container in your account, no configuration needed. The results are returned immediately in the notebook.

Improved developer productivity

We’ve also bundled in version 4 of our Azure Cosmos DB Python SDK

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17

Sep

HDInsight support in Azure CLI now out of preview

https://azure.microsoft.com/blog/hdinsight-support-in-azure-cli-now-out-of-preview/We are pleased to share that support for HDInsight in Azure CLI is now generally available. The addition of the az hdinsight command group allows you to easily manage your HDInsight clusters using simple commands while taking advantage of all READ MORE

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