Category Archives : Developer

20

Jun

Traffic Analytics now generally available
Traffic Analytics now generally available

We are excited to announce the general availability (GA) of the Traffic Analytics, a SaaS solution that provides visibility into user and application traffic on your cloud networks.

Since the public preview, three months ago, the solution has analyzed several terabytes of Flow logs on a regular basis for network activity across virtual subnets, VNets, Azure data center regions and VPNs, and provided actionable insights that helped our customers:

Audit their networks and root out shadow-IT and non-compliant workloads. Optimize the placement of their workloads and improve the user experience for their end users. Detect security issues and improve application and data security. Reduce costs and right size their deployments by eliminating the issue of over-provisioning or under-utilization. Gain visibility into their public cloud networks spanning multiple Azure regions across numerous subscriptions.

This GA release includes enhancements that help you detect issues and secure/optimize your network, faster and more intuitively than before.

Some of the enhancements in this release are:

Your environment: Provides a view into your entire Azure network, identifies inactive regions, virtual networks, and subnets – for example, network locations with VMs and no network activity for further analysis. Detects malicious flows as they flow across application gateways,

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20

Jun

Traffic Analytics now generally available
Traffic Analytics now generally available

We are excited to announce the general availability (GA) of the Traffic Analytics, a SaaS solution that provides visibility into user and application traffic on your cloud networks.

Since the public preview, three months ago, the solution has analyzed several terabytes of Flow logs on a regular basis for network activity across virtual subnets, VNets, Azure data center regions and VPNs, and provided actionable insights that helped our customers:

Audit their networks and root out shadow-IT and non-compliant workloads. Optimize the placement of their workloads and improve the user experience for their end users. Detect security issues and improve application and data security. Reduce costs and right size their deployments by eliminating the issue of over-provisioning or under-utilization. Gain visibility into their public cloud networks spanning multiple Azure regions across numerous subscriptions.

This GA release includes enhancements that help you detect issues and secure/optimize your network, faster and more intuitively than before.

Some of the enhancements in this release are:

Your environment: Provides a view into your entire Azure network, identifies inactive regions, virtual networks, and subnets – for example, network locations with VMs and no network activity for further analysis. Detects malicious flows as they flow across application gateways,

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14

Jun

Container Tooling for Service Fabric in Visual Studio 2017
Container Tooling for Service Fabric in Visual Studio 2017

The latest version of the Service Fabric tools, which is part of Visual Studio 2017 Update 7 (15.7), includes the new container tooling for Service Fabric feature. This new feature makes debugging and deploying existing applications, in containers, on Service Fabric easier than ever before.

Containerize .NET Framework and .NET Core applications and run them on Service Fabric

You can now take an existing console or ASP.NET application, deploy it to a container image, and run and debug it in Service Fabric as a container on your local developer workstation. With a few clicks, you can make your existing .NET application run in a container in a Service Fabric environment. Simply right-click on your project in Solution Explorer and selecting Add –> Container Orchestrator Support. This will display a dialog box where you select Service Fabric and click OK.

Doing this will create a Docker file in your project and add the required Service Fabric files, as well as create a new Service Fabric application project in the solution. If your project is part of a solution with an existing Service Fabric application, it will be added to that application automatically. This must be done for each project in

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14

Jun

Container Tooling for Service Fabric in Visual Studio 2017
Container Tooling for Service Fabric in Visual Studio 2017

The latest version of the Service Fabric tools, which is part of Visual Studio 2017 Update 7 (15.7), includes the new container tooling for Service Fabric feature. This new feature makes debugging and deploying existing applications, in containers, on Service Fabric easier than ever before.

Containerize .NET Framework and .NET Core applications and run them on Service Fabric

You can now take an existing console or ASP.NET application, deploy it to a container image, and run and debug it in Service Fabric as a container on your local developer workstation. With a few clicks, you can make your existing .NET application run in a container in a Service Fabric environment. Simply right-click on your project in Solution Explorer and selecting Add –> Container Orchestrator Support. This will display a dialog box where you select Service Fabric and click OK.

Doing this will create a Docker file in your project and add the required Service Fabric files, as well as create a new Service Fabric application project in the solution. If your project is part of a solution with an existing Service Fabric application, it will be added to that application automatically. This must be done for each project in

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13

Jun

Participate in the 15th Developer Economics Survey
Participate in the 15th Developer Economics Survey

The Developer Economics Q2 2018 survey is here in its 15th edition to shed light on the future of the software industry. Every year more than 40,000 developers around the world participate in this survey, so this is a chance to be part of something big, voice your thoughts, and make your own contribution to the developer community.

Is this survey for me?

The survey is for all developers engaging in the following software development areas: cloud, mobile, desktop, IoT, AR/VR, machine learning, data science, web, backend, and gaming.

What questions am I likely to be asked?

The survey asks questions about the status and the future of the software industry.

What’s going up and what’s going down in the software industry? Are you working on the projects you would like to work on? Where do you think development time should be invested? Which are your favorite tools and platforms? What’s in it for me?

There are some perks to go with your participation. Have a look at what you can get our hands on:

Amazing prizes up for grabs: A Samsung S9 Plus phone, an iPhone X, an HP Windows Mixed Reality Headset with Motion Controllers, an HTC Vive

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13

Jun

Participate in the 15th Developer Economics Survey
Participate in the 15th Developer Economics Survey

The Developer Economics Q2 2018 survey is here in its 15th edition to shed light on the future of the software industry. Every year more than 40,000 developers around the world participate in this survey, so this is a chance to be part of something big, voice your thoughts, and make your own contribution to the developer community.

Is this survey for me?

The survey is for all developers engaging in the following software development areas: cloud, mobile, desktop, IoT, AR/VR, machine learning, data science, web, backend, and gaming.

What questions am I likely to be asked?

The survey asks questions about the status and the future of the software industry.

What’s going up and what’s going down in the software industry? Are you working on the projects you would like to work on? Where do you think development time should be invested? Which are your favorite tools and platforms? What’s in it for me?

There are some perks to go with your participation. Have a look at what you can get our hands on:

Amazing prizes up for grabs: A Samsung S9 Plus phone, an iPhone X, an HP Windows Mixed Reality Headset with Motion Controllers, an HTC Vive

Share

13

Jun

SmartHotel360 Microservices on Azure Kubernetes Service
SmartHotel360 Microservices on Azure Kubernetes Service

During the Build 2018 keynote, Scott Hanselman, with help from Scott Guthrie, showed developers the new features available in Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) and Azure Dev Spaces. To help you learn how to deploy microservices written in any framework to AKS we’ve updated the SmartHotel360 back-end microservices source code and deployment process to optimize it for AKS. You can clone, fork, or download the AKS and Azure Dev Spaces demo on GitHub.

Azure Kubernetes Service gives developers the best experience for building microservices in any platform including Java, .NET Core, or Node.js, to name a few used in this demo’s source code, using Kubernetes and containers. The diagram below shows a high-level snapshot of the back-end APIs housed in the AKS cluster once you deploy this repository’s source code to AKS.

Sample queries shipped with the demo can be saved and executed in an AKS cluster to get deep visibility into how each service is running. The query below, for example, results with a bar chart showing how often a certain pattern appears in the execution logs.

Azure Dev Spaces provides a rapid, iterative Kubernetes development experience for teams. With minimal dev machine setup, you can iteratively run

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13

Jun

SmartHotel360 Microservices on Azure Kubernetes Service
SmartHotel360 Microservices on Azure Kubernetes Service

During the Build 2018 keynote, Scott Hanselman, with help from Scott Guthrie, showed developers the new features available in Azure Kubernetes Service (AKS) and Azure Dev Spaces. To help you learn how to deploy microservices written in any framework to AKS we’ve updated the SmartHotel360 back-end microservices source code and deployment process to optimize it for AKS. You can clone, fork, or download the AKS and Azure Dev Spaces demo on GitHub.

Azure Kubernetes Service gives developers the best experience for building microservices in any platform including Java, .NET Core, or Node.js, to name a few used in this demo’s source code, using Kubernetes and containers. The diagram below shows a high-level snapshot of the back-end APIs housed in the AKS cluster once you deploy this repository’s source code to AKS.

Sample queries shipped with the demo can be saved and executed in an AKS cluster to get deep visibility into how each service is running. The query below, for example, results with a bar chart showing how often a certain pattern appears in the execution logs.

Azure Dev Spaces provides a rapid, iterative Kubernetes development experience for teams. With minimal dev machine setup, you can iteratively run

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13

Jun

Exciting advances in Azure Alerts – From better alert management to Smart Groups

Today we are excited to announce preview of three new features in Azure Monitor that let you enumerate alerts at scale across log, metric or activity log alerts, filter alerts across subscriptions, manage alert states, look at alert instance specific details, and troubleshoot issues faster using SmartGroups that automatically group related alerts. These features continue to enhance the unified alerts configuration experience announced earlier this year. We look forward to your feedback to refine the functionality further.

The new alert enumeration experience and API allows observing alerts across Azure deployments. Alerts across multiple subscriptions can be queried and pivoted on severity, signal types, resource type, and more allowing a performant and easy summary-to-drill down experience. The new enumeration experience also supports multi-select filtering on any relevant dimension, allowing for example, looking up alerts across a set of resource groups or specific resource types.

Alert state management provides users a way to change the state of the alert to reflect the current situation of the issue in their environment. Currently three alert states are supported – New, Acknowledged, and Closed.

Alert states are separate from the monitoring condition, which is updated by the underlying monitoring service that detected the issue.

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13

Jun

Exciting advances in Azure Alerts – From better alert management to Smart Groups

Today we are excited to announce preview of three new features in Azure Monitor that let you enumerate alerts at scale across log, metric or activity log alerts, filter alerts across subscriptions, manage alert states, look at alert instance specific details, and troubleshoot issues faster using SmartGroups that automatically group related alerts. These features continue to enhance the unified alerts configuration experience announced earlier this year. We look forward to your feedback to refine the functionality further.

The new alert enumeration experience and API allows observing alerts across Azure deployments. Alerts across multiple subscriptions can be queried and pivoted on severity, signal types, resource type, and more allowing a performant and easy summary-to-drill down experience. The new enumeration experience also supports multi-select filtering on any relevant dimension, allowing for example, looking up alerts across a set of resource groups or specific resource types.

Alert state management provides users a way to change the state of the alert to reflect the current situation of the issue in their environment. Currently three alert states are supported – New, Acknowledged, and Closed.

Alert states are separate from the monitoring condition, which is updated by the underlying monitoring service that detected the issue.

Share