Category Archives : Developer

25

Jul

Azure App Service now supports Java SE on Linux
Azure App Service now supports Java SE on Linux

Lately there have been a whole lot of changes to Java and its vibrant communities. Now shared between Oracle for Java SE and Eclipse Foundation for Jakarta EE (formerly Java EE), Java continues to be the leading programming language by developers and enterprises. As a matter of fact, it is now well-positioned to thrive in the cloud considering how modern application development is trending with over 12 million Java developers worldwide, and digital transformation being top of mind for many IT organizations.

With the sheer volume of Java apps in existence and soon to be developed, Java developers will benefit greatly from cloud services that will enable fast and secure application development while saving time and cost. Couple this with a vast geographic region coverage, it is a cloud solution every developer should experience.

Today, Microsoft is pleased to announce that Azure App Service now supports Java SE 8 based applications on Linux, now available in public preview. This and subsequent time released versions will be supported for an extended period, as well as upcoming LTS versions. Java web apps can now be built and deployed on a highly scalable, self-patching web hosting service where bug fixes and security updates

24

Jul

Build richer applications with the new asynchronous Azure Storage SDK for Java

Cloud scale applications typically require high concurrency to achieve desired performance when accessing remote data. The new Storage Java SDK simplifies building such applications by offering asynchronous operations, eliminating the need to create and manage a large thread-pool. This new SDK uses the RxJava reactive programming model for asynchronous operations, also relying on Netty HTTP client for REST requests. Get started with the Azure Storage SDK for Java now.

Azure Storage SDK v10 for Java adopts the next-generation Storage SDK design providing thread-safe types that were introduced earlier with the Storage Go SDK release. This new SDK is built to effectively move data without any buffering on the client, and provides interfaces close to the ones in the Storage REST APIs. Some of the improvements in the new SDK are:

Asynchronous programming model with RxJava Low-level APIs consistent with Storage REST APIs New high-level APIs built for convenience Thread-safe interfaces Consistent versioning across all Storage SDKs Asynchronous programming model with RxJava

Now that the Storage SDK supports RxJava it is easier to build event driven applications. This is because it allows you to compose sequences together with the observer pattern. The following sample, that uploads a directory of xml files

24

Jul

Build richer applications with the new asynchronous Azure Storage SDK for Java

Cloud scale applications typically require high concurrency to achieve desired performance when accessing remote data. The new Storage Java SDK simplifies building such applications by offering asynchronous operations, eliminating the need to create and manage a large thread-pool. This new SDK uses the RxJava reactive programming model for asynchronous operations, also relying on Netty HTTP client for REST requests. Get started with the Azure Storage SDK for Java now.

Azure Storage SDK v10 for Java adopts the next-generation Storage SDK design providing thread-safe types that were introduced earlier with the Storage Go SDK release. This new SDK is built to effectively move data without any buffering on the client, and provides interfaces close to the ones in the Storage REST APIs. Some of the improvements in the new SDK are:

Asynchronous programming model with RxJava Low-level APIs consistent with Storage REST APIs New high-level APIs built for convenience Thread-safe interfaces Consistent versioning across all Storage SDKs Asynchronous programming model with RxJava

Now that the Storage SDK supports RxJava it is easier to build event driven applications. This is because it allows you to compose sequences together with the observer pattern. The following sample, that uploads a directory of xml files

17

Jul

Announcing the Azure Cloud Shell editor in collaboration with Visual Studio Code

Last year at the //Build conference we launched the Azure Cloud Shell in the Azure portal, providing our users with a cloud-native command-line environment from any device, anywhere in the world. Over the last year, we’ve seen incredible adoption, with thousands of users logging in every day.

We’ve added some incredible integrations that make Cloud Shell even more powerful. We added automatic authorization for pre-installed open source tools like Terraform, Ansible, and InSpec. We’ve also partnered with other Microsoft teams to enable the Try It experiences for Azure and .NET documentation. Additionally, we worked with the Visual Studio Code team to embed Cloud Shell inside of Visual Studio Code and the Azure mobile app team to integrate Cloud Shell into the Azure mobile app for easy access from mobile devices everywhere.

Overall, the feedback we received from our active user base demonstrates the utility and value of Cloud Shell to our users. As we looked at the ways that people are using Cloud Shell, we realized early on that providing our users with easy-to-use choices for managing their cloud infrastructure via the web browser was critical to success.

Since launch, we have provided a variety of editors (vi, emacs, nano)

17

Jul

Announcing the Azure Cloud Shell editor in collaboration with Visual Studio Code

Last year at the //Build conference we launched the Azure Cloud Shell in the Azure portal, providing our users with a cloud-native command-line environment from any device, anywhere in the world. Over the last year, we’ve seen incredible adoption, with thousands of users logging in every day.

We’ve added some incredible integrations that make Cloud Shell even more powerful. We added automatic authorization for pre-installed open source tools like Terraform, Ansible, and InSpec. We’ve also partnered with other Microsoft teams to enable the Try It experiences for Azure and .NET documentation. Additionally, we worked with the Visual Studio Code team to embed Cloud Shell inside of Visual Studio Code and the Azure mobile app team to integrate Cloud Shell into the Azure mobile app for easy access from mobile devices everywhere.

Overall, the feedback we received from our active user base demonstrates the utility and value of Cloud Shell to our users. As we looked at the ways that people are using Cloud Shell, we realized early on that providing our users with easy-to-use choices for managing their cloud infrastructure via the web browser was critical to success.

Since launch, we have provided a variety of editors (vi, emacs, nano)

16

Jul

Spring Data Gremlin for Azure Cosmos DB Graph API

We are pleased to announce that Spring Data Gremlin is now available on Maven Central and source code on GitHub. This project provides Spring Data support for Graph databases that use Gremlin as a traversal language. For Azure users, it provides a delightful experience to interact with Azure Cosmos DB using Graph API. Java developers can now use Spring annotations to map with database entities, such as Vertex and Edge. It also allows developers to create their own database queries based on Spring Data Repository.

Key features

Spring Data Gremlin supports annotation-oriented programming model to simplify the mapping to the database entity. It also provides supports to create custom queries.

Mapping with database entities, including annotations.

@Id to map a filed in the domain class with id field of an entity.
@Vertex and @VertexSet map to Vertex. @Edge, @EdgeSet, @EdgeFrom and @EdgeTo to map with Edge

Advanced operations with Vertex, Edge and Graph.

findVertexById and findEdgeById to find data by specific field. vertexCount and edgeCount for counting Vertex and Edge numbers.

Spring Data CRUD functionality.

Custom database queries based on Spring Data Repository. Getting started

You can follow this tutorial to create a Graph database instance in

10

Jul

General availability of user behavior analytics tools in Azure Application Insights

At Microsoft Build 2017, we introduced a set of user behavior analytics tools for Application Insights as a preview. Since then, we’ve listened to your feedback, adding additional capabilities and squashing bugs. We’ve also used these user behavior analytics tools on themselves, finding opportunities to improve your experience without you even having to ask!

With this additional polish, today we’re graduating these tools out of preview to general availability. You can expect these tools – Users, Sessions, Events, User Flows, Funnels, Retention, Cohorts, and Impact – to be stable, well-supported parts of Application Insights going forward. 

How can I try these tools?

Users, Sessions, Events, and the other user behavior analytics tools are part of each Application Insights resource in the Azure portal. To get started with Application Insights, follow one of the quickstarts based on your app’s stack. Once you have an Application Insights resource, you’ll find the user behavior analytics tools in the left menu under “Usage.”

What’s new since last year?

A lot! Users, Sessions, and Events were re-built from the ground up to be more responsive, load more quickly, and provide more insights automatically. Learn more about Users, Sessions, and Events.

We also added six

03

Jul

New Azure #CosmosDB Explorer now in public preview
New Azure #CosmosDB Explorer now in public preview

Today we’re excited to announce Azure Cosmos DB Explorer, a full screen standalone web-based version of the Data Explorer many of you already use in Azure Portal for Cosmos DB.

With Cosmos DB Explorer you can:

Take advantage of the full screen real estate for your queries and results. Access your database account and collections with a connection string, without needing access to the Azure subscription or portal. Share query results with authorized peers who do not have Azure portal access. Work with Cosmos DB data without having to download any desktop tools locally.

From Azure Portal, you can open your account in Cosmos DB Explorer by clicking on the Open Full Screen button in Data Explorer blade.

In the drop-down dialog you can choose the type of access you’d like to open the account with and click Open, “read & write” is default. You can also copy the Cosmos DB Explorer link and share with your colleagues, for example if you want to share read-only results of a query with teammates who don’t have access to Azure Portal.

When you open Cosmos DB Explorer this way, the access will expire in few hours for security reasons. After

03

Jul

New Azure #CosmosDB Explorer now in public preview
New Azure #CosmosDB Explorer now in public preview

Today we’re excited to announce Azure Cosmos DB Explorer, a full screen standalone web-based version of the Data Explorer many of you already use in Azure Portal for Cosmos DB.

With Cosmos DB Explorer you can:

Take advantage of the full screen real estate for your queries and results. Access your database account and collections with a connection string, without needing access to the Azure subscription or portal. Share query results with authorized peers who do not have Azure portal access. Work with Cosmos DB data without having to download any desktop tools locally.

From Azure Portal, you can open your account in Cosmos DB Explorer by clicking on the Open Full Screen button in Data Explorer blade.

In the drop-down dialog you can choose the type of access you’d like to open the account with and click Open, “read & write” is default. You can also copy the Cosmos DB Explorer link and share with your colleagues, for example if you want to share read-only results of a query with teammates who don’t have access to Azure Portal.

When you open Cosmos DB Explorer this way, the access will expire in few hours for security reasons. After

02

Jul

Azure Search – Announcing the general availability of synonyms

Today we are announcing the general availability of synonyms. Synonyms allow Azure Search to associate equivalent terms that implicitly expand the scope of a query, without the user having to provide the alternate terms.

A good example of this capability was demonstrated at the recent Microsoft Build conference, where we showed how NBA.com searches their vast photo library of players, owners, and celebrities. In this application Azure Search synonyms are used to enable nicknames of Lebron James such as “The King” or “King James” to be returned regardless of which of the three terms are used in the query.

In Azure Search, synonym support is based on synonym maps that you define and upload to your search service. These maps constitute an independent resource, such as indexes or data sources, and can be used by any searchable field in any index in your search service. Synonym maps use the Apache Solr format as outlined in the example synonym map below:

POST https://[servicename].search.windows.net/synonymmaps?api-version=2017-11-11 api-key: [admin key] { “name”:”mysynonymmap”, “format”:”solr”, “synonyms”: ” USA, United States, United States of American Washington, Wash., WA => WAn” }

In the above example, you can see there are two types of synonyms that are