Category Archives : Developer

13

Jun

Exciting advances in Azure Alerts – From better alert management to Smart Groups

Today we are excited to announce preview of three new features in Azure Monitor that let you enumerate alerts at scale across log, metric or activity log alerts, filter alerts across subscriptions, manage alert states, look at alert instance specific details, and troubleshoot issues faster using SmartGroups that automatically group related alerts. These features continue to enhance the unified alerts configuration experience announced earlier this year. We look forward to your feedback to refine the functionality further.

The new alert enumeration experience and API allows observing alerts across Azure deployments. Alerts across multiple subscriptions can be queried and pivoted on severity, signal types, resource type, and more allowing a performant and easy summary-to-drill down experience. The new enumeration experience also supports multi-select filtering on any relevant dimension, allowing for example, looking up alerts across a set of resource groups or specific resource types.

Alert state management provides users a way to change the state of the alert to reflect the current situation of the issue in their environment. Currently three alert states are supported – New, Acknowledged, and Closed.

Alert states are separate from the monitoring condition, which is updated by the underlying monitoring service that detected the issue.

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07

Jun

Using STMicroelectronics starter kits to connect to Azure IoT in minutes

Microsoft partners with silicon vendors such as STMicroelectronics to simplify and accelerate the development of embedded systems, so our customers can move projects from proof of concepts to production faster. One of the most common issues in IoT project development is the passage from proof of concept to production, from a handful of devices to deployment and management of devices at an IoT scale and from development hardware to mass produced silicon.

STMicroelectronics offers a wide range of IoT hardware along with pre-integrated software, a powerful development ecosystem and valuable starter kits. With these, connecting to Azure IoT Hub the cloud platform, monitor, and manage billions of IoT assets using one of the Microsoft Azure Certified ST devices takes minutes and you don’t have to write any code! This magic is possible because of the integration ST provides under the cover. For example, STM32 IoT Discovery Kit Node is an Arm® Cortex®-M4-core-based developer kit and sporting a full set of low power wireless connectivity options and environmental, motion and ranging sensors. FP-CLD-AZURE1 is an STM32Cube function pack that ST developed for this kit. Azure IoT C SDK is integrated into the middleware of this function pack, which enables direct and

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06

Jun

Azure Data Lake Tools for VSCode supports Azure blob storage integration

We are pleased to announce the integration of VSCode explorer with Azure blob storage. If you are a data scientist and want to explore the data in your Azure blob storage, please try the Data Lake Explorer blob storage integration. If you are a developer and want to access and manage your Azure blob storage files, please try the Data Lake Explorer blob storage integration. The Data Lake Explorer allows you easily navigate to your blob storage, access and manage your blob container, folder and files.  

Summary of new features

Blob container – Refresh, Delete Blob Container and Upload Blob 

Folder in blob – Refresh and Upload Blob 

File in blob – Preview/Edit, Download, Delete, Create EXTRACT Script (only available for CSV, TSV and TXT files), as well as Copy Relative Path, and Copy Full Path

How to install or update

Install Visual Studio Code and download Mono 4.2.x (for Linux and Mac). Then get the latest Azure Data Lake Tools by going to the VSCode Extension repository or the VSCode Marketplace and searching Azure Data Lake Tools.

For more information about Azure Data Lake Tool for VSCode, please use

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06

Jun

Azure Search is now certified for several levels of compliance

Compliance is an important factor for customers when looking at software and services as they look to meet their own compliance obligations across regulated industries and markets worldwide. For example, ISO 27001 certification is a security standard that provides a baseline set of requirements for many other international standards and regulations and HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act) is a US law that establishes requirements for the use, disclosure, and safeguarding of protected health information (PHI).

For that reason, we are excited to announce that Azure Search has been certified for several levels of compliance including:

ISO 27001:2013 SOC 2 Type 2 GxP (21 CFR Part 11) HIPAA and the HITECH Act HITRUST PCI DSS Level 1 Australia IRAP Unclassified

With these certifications and attestations, we hope to enable Azure Search as a viable option for customers looking to meet and attain key international and industry-specific compliance standards within their solutions.

Azure compliance offerings are grouped into four segments: globally applicable, US government, industry specific, and region/country specific. To view an overview of Azure Search as well as other Microsoft Azure compliance offerings, please visit the Microsoft Trust Center. In addition, you can directly download a document that provides

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05

Jun

Get started with U-SQL: It’s easy!
Get started with U-SQL: It’s easy!

Azure Data Lake Analytics combines declarative and imperative concepts in the form of a new language called U-SQL. The idea of learning a new language is daunting. Don’t worry! U-SQL is easy to learn. You can learn the vast majority of the language in a single day. If you are familiar with SQL or languages like C# or Java, you will find that learning U-SQL is natural and that you will be productive incredibly fast.
  
A common question we get is “How can I get started with U-SQL?” This blog will show you all the core steps you need to get ramped up on U-SQL.

What is U-SQL?

U-SQL is the big data query language and execution framework in the Azure Data Lake Analytics. U-SQL uses familiar SQL concepts and language to scale out your custom code (.NET/C#/Python) from Gigabyte to Petabyte scale. U-SQL offers the usual big data processing concepts such as “schema on reads,” custom processors, and reducers. The language lets you query and combine data from multiple data sources including Azure Data Lake Storage, Azure Blob Storage, Azure SQL DB, Azure SQL Data Warehouse and SQL Server instances running on Azure VMs.

Step 1: Read the

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04

Jun

Use Azure Monitor to integrate with SIEM tools
Use Azure Monitor to integrate with SIEM tools

Over the past two years since introducing Azure Monitor, we’ve made significant strides in terms of consolidating on a single logging pipeline for all Azure services. A majority of the top Azure services, including Azure Resource Manager and Azure Security Center, have onboarded to Azure Monitor and are producing relevant security logs.

We’ve also delivered key capabilities to simplify the integration process with security information and event management (SIEM) tools, such as routing data to a single event hub and enabling multiple diagnostic settings per resource, and have work in flight that will ease setup and management of log routing across large Azure environments.

Meanwhile, we’ve been partnering with the top SIEM partners to build connectors that get the data from Azure Monitor into those tools. These connectors consume data routed to Azure Event Hubs by Azure Monitor – a simple, scalable, and manageable approach for delivering log data to an external application, and Microsoft’s recommended approach for integrating Azure with SIEM tools going forwards. Read more about how you can set up your Azure environment to send data to these SIEM tools.

We’ve also continued to support customers who are using the Azure Log Integration tool (AzLog) to integrate

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01

Jun

How I choose which services to use in Azure
How I choose which services to use in Azure

This blog post was co-authored by Barry Luijbregts, Azure MVP.

Last year, I attended a Pluralsight webinar hosted by Azure MVP and Pluralsight author, Barry Luijbregts, called Keep your dev team productive with the right Azure service. It was a fantastic webinar and I really enjoyed learning Barry’s thought process on how he selects which Azure services and capabilities to use for his own projects, and when he consults for his clients. Recently, I asked Barry to share his process in this blog post and on an episode of Azure Friday with Scott Hanselman (included below).

Microsoft Azure is huge and changes fast! I’m impressed by the services and capabilities offered in Azure and by how quickly Microsoft releases new services and features. It can be overwhelming. There is so much out there — and the list continues to grow — it is sometimes hard to know which services to use for a given scenario.

I create Azure solutions for my customers, and I have a method that I use to help me pick the right services. This method helps me narrow down the services to choose from and pick the right ones for my solution. It helps me decide

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31

May

VNet service endpoints for Azure database services for MySQL and PostgreSQL in preview

This blog post was co-authored by Anitha Adusumilli, Principal Program Manager, Azure Networking.

We recently made Azure database services for MySQL and PostgreSQL generally available. These services offer the community versions of MySQL and PostgreSQL with built-in high availability, a 99.99% availability SLA, elastic scaling for performance, and industry leading security and compliance on Azure. Since general availability, we have continued to bring new features and capabilities like increased storage and availability across more regions worldwide.

We are excited to announce the public preview of Virtual Network (VNet) service endpoints for Azure Database for MySQL and PostgreSQL in all regions where the service is available. Visit region expansion for MySQL and PostgreSQL for service availability. VNet service endpoints enable you to isolate connectivity to your logical server from only a given subnet or set of subnets within your virtual network. The traffic to Azure Database for MySQL and/or PostgreSQL from your VNet always stays within the Azure backbone network. Preference for this direct route is over any specific ones that route Internet traffic through virtual appliances or on-premises.

There is no additional billing for virtual network access through service endpoints. The current pricing model for Azure Database for MySQL and

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31

May

Make Azure IoT Hub C SDK work on tiny devices!
Make Azure IoT Hub C SDK work on tiny devices!

Azure IoT Hub C SDK is written in ANSI C (C99), which makes it well-suited for a variety of platforms with small disk and memory footprint. We recommend at least 64KB of RAM, but the exact memory footprint depends on the protocol used, the number of connections opened, as well as the platform targeted. This blog walks through how to optimize the C SDK for constrained devices.

We release our C SDK as packages on apt-get, NuGet and MBED to accelerate the development process. However, if your system is constrained in ROM or RAM, you may want to build the SDK locally and remove certain features to shrink the footprint of the C SDK. We will be using cmake to demonstrate in this blog. In addition, the programming model for working with constrained devices is different. This blog will also discuss some best practices to reduce memory consumption. There is also official documentation on how to develop for constrained devices available to you.

Building the C SDK for constrained devices

First, you need to prepare your development environment following this guide. When you get to the step for building with cmake, you can invoke flags to remove certain features.

TL;DR:

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31

May

Receiving and handling HTTP requests anywhere with the Azure Relay

If you followed Microsoft’s coverage from the Build 2018 conference, you may have been as excited as we were about the new Visual Studio Live Share feature that allows instant, remote, peer-to-peer collaboration between Visual Studio users, no matter where they are. One developer could be sitting in a coffee shop and another on a plane with in-flight WiFi, and yet both can collaborate directly on code.

The “networking magic” that enables the Visual Studio team to offer this feature is the Azure Relay, which is a part of the messaging services family along with Azure Service Bus, Azure Event Hubs, and Azure Event Grid. The Relay is, indeed, the oldest of all Azure services, with the earliest public incubation having started exactly 12 years ago today, and it was amongst the handful of original services that launched with the Azure platform in January 2010.

In the meantime, the Relay has learned to speak a fully documented open protocol that can work with any WebSocket client stack, and allows any such client to become a listener for inbound connections from other clients, without needing inbound firewall rules, public IP addresses, or DNS registrations. Since all inbound communication terminates inside the

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