Category Archives : Developer

16

Jul

Spring Data Gremlin for Azure Cosmos DB Graph API

We are pleased to announce that Spring Data Gremlin is now available on Maven Central and source code on GitHub. This project provides Spring Data support for Graph databases that use Gremlin as a traversal language. For Azure users, it provides a delightful experience to interact with Azure Cosmos DB using Graph API. Java developers can now use Spring annotations to map with database entities, such as Vertex and Edge. It also allows developers to create their own database queries based on Spring Data Repository.

Key features

Spring Data Gremlin supports annotation-oriented programming model to simplify the mapping to the database entity. It also provides supports to create custom queries.

Mapping with database entities, including annotations.

@Id to map a filed in the domain class with id field of an entity.
@Vertex and @VertexSet map to Vertex. @Edge, @EdgeSet, @EdgeFrom and @EdgeTo to map with Edge

Advanced operations with Vertex, Edge and Graph.

findVertexById and findEdgeById to find data by specific field. vertexCount and edgeCount for counting Vertex and Edge numbers.

Spring Data CRUD functionality.

Custom database queries based on Spring Data Repository. Getting started

You can follow this tutorial to create a Graph database instance in

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10

Jul

General availability of user behavior analytics tools in Azure Application Insights

At Microsoft Build 2017, we introduced a set of user behavior analytics tools for Application Insights as a preview. Since then, we’ve listened to your feedback, adding additional capabilities and squashing bugs. We’ve also used these user behavior analytics tools on themselves, finding opportunities to improve your experience without you even having to ask!

With this additional polish, today we’re graduating these tools out of preview to general availability. You can expect these tools – Users, Sessions, Events, User Flows, Funnels, Retention, Cohorts, and Impact – to be stable, well-supported parts of Application Insights going forward. 

How can I try these tools?

Users, Sessions, Events, and the other user behavior analytics tools are part of each Application Insights resource in the Azure portal. To get started with Application Insights, follow one of the quickstarts based on your app’s stack. Once you have an Application Insights resource, you’ll find the user behavior analytics tools in the left menu under “Usage.”

What’s new since last year?

A lot! Users, Sessions, and Events were re-built from the ground up to be more responsive, load more quickly, and provide more insights automatically. Learn more about Users, Sessions, and Events.

We also added six

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03

Jul

New Azure #CosmosDB Explorer now in public preview
New Azure #CosmosDB Explorer now in public preview

Today we’re excited to announce Azure Cosmos DB Explorer, a full screen standalone web-based version of the Data Explorer many of you already use in Azure Portal for Cosmos DB.

With Cosmos DB Explorer you can:

Take advantage of the full screen real estate for your queries and results. Access your database account and collections with a connection string, without needing access to the Azure subscription or portal. Share query results with authorized peers who do not have Azure portal access. Work with Cosmos DB data without having to download any desktop tools locally.

From Azure Portal, you can open your account in Cosmos DB Explorer by clicking on the Open Full Screen button in Data Explorer blade.

In the drop-down dialog you can choose the type of access you’d like to open the account with and click Open, “read & write” is default. You can also copy the Cosmos DB Explorer link and share with your colleagues, for example if you want to share read-only results of a query with teammates who don’t have access to Azure Portal.

When you open Cosmos DB Explorer this way, the access will expire in few hours for security reasons. After

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03

Jul

New Azure #CosmosDB Explorer now in public preview
New Azure #CosmosDB Explorer now in public preview

Today we’re excited to announce Azure Cosmos DB Explorer, a full screen standalone web-based version of the Data Explorer many of you already use in Azure Portal for Cosmos DB.

With Cosmos DB Explorer you can:

Take advantage of the full screen real estate for your queries and results. Access your database account and collections with a connection string, without needing access to the Azure subscription or portal. Share query results with authorized peers who do not have Azure portal access. Work with Cosmos DB data without having to download any desktop tools locally.

From Azure Portal, you can open your account in Cosmos DB Explorer by clicking on the Open Full Screen button in Data Explorer blade.

In the drop-down dialog you can choose the type of access you’d like to open the account with and click Open, “read & write” is default. You can also copy the Cosmos DB Explorer link and share with your colleagues, for example if you want to share read-only results of a query with teammates who don’t have access to Azure Portal.

When you open Cosmos DB Explorer this way, the access will expire in few hours for security reasons. After

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02

Jul

Azure Search – Announcing the general availability of synonyms

Today we are announcing the general availability of synonyms. Synonyms allow Azure Search to associate equivalent terms that implicitly expand the scope of a query, without the user having to provide the alternate terms.

A good example of this capability was demonstrated at the recent Microsoft Build conference, where we showed how NBA.com searches their vast photo library of players, owners, and celebrities. In this application Azure Search synonyms are used to enable nicknames of Lebron James such as “The King” or “King James” to be returned regardless of which of the three terms are used in the query.

In Azure Search, synonym support is based on synonym maps that you define and upload to your search service. These maps constitute an independent resource, such as indexes or data sources, and can be used by any searchable field in any index in your search service. Synonym maps use the Apache Solr format as outlined in the example synonym map below:

POST https://[servicename].search.windows.net/synonymmaps?api-version=2017-11-11 api-key: [admin key] { “name”:”mysynonymmap”, “format”:”solr”, “synonyms”: ” USA, United States, United States of American Washington, Wash., WA => WAn” }

In the above example, you can see there are two types of synonyms that are

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02

Jul

Securing the connection between Power BI and Azure SQL Database

How can you connect to Azure SQL Database from the Power BI service in a secure fashion? The easiest way to limit access to the database is to select the “allow access to Azure Services” option (Figure1). This can be found in the database server options in the Azure portal. This allows Power BI to access your database. However, it also makes the database visible to any component deployed within Azure, such as a virtual machine. For many organizations this is not sufficient for their security and compliance requirements.


Figure 1: Setting the database access in the Azure Portal.

  The following is a list of suggestions that one may want to consider achieving the organizations security goals:

To start, use VNet service endpoints to further secure access. This feature was introduced at the start of 2018. This is easy to configure. In the Azure portal either create a new virtual network or edit an existing VNet and enable service endpoints for SQL in the VNet (Figure2).

Figure 2: Creating a service endpoint in the virtual network.

Once completed, the next task is to set up a virtual network rule on the database server. This allows us to restrict

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28

Jun

Using the Retry pattern to make your cloud application more resilient

This post was authored by Jason Haley, Microsoft Azure MVP.

Recently, I was at Boston Code Camp catching up with some old friends and looking to learn about containers or anything that could help me in my current project of migrating a microservices application to run in containers. I was speaking with one friend who had just presented a session on Polly, and he made a comment that got my attention. He said that one of the attendees at his session was under the impression that using the cloud would make his application inherently resilient and he would not need any of the features that Polly provides.

In case you are not familiar with Polly, you can use this library to easily add common patterns like Retry, Circuit Breaker, Timeout, Bulkhead Isolation, and Fallback to your code to make your system more resilient. Scott Hanselman recently wrote a blog post: Adding Resilience and Transient Fault handling to your .NET Core HttpClient with Polly, discussing how he was using Polly and HttpClient with ASP.NET Core 2.1.

What that attendee may have been referring to is that most Azure services and client SDKs have features to perform retries for you (which can

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28

Jun

Autocomplete in Azure Search now in public preview

Today, we are happy to announce public preview support for autocomplete in Azure Search, one of our most requested features on UserVoice. Autocomplete, also called “type-ahead search”, can enhance the search experience by finding potential terms in the index that match the partial term being written by the user. An example of similar functionality is shown below from bing.com:

 

Autocomplete modes

For autocomplete to work, the fields in the search index should be listed in a suggester. For example, if you define a suggester on a city field, typing “sea” will return terms like “Seattle” or “Seaside” if those terms exist in the city field.

The table below describes the 3 modes supported by Autocomplete and the expected results in each scenario.

Mode Behavior Query Autocompleted results OneTerm Returns a single term which autocompletes the partial term of the query. “what a wo

“women”

“wool”

“world”

TwoTerms Returns a single term and two terms which autocomplete the partial term of the query. “what a wo

“wonderful day”

“wolf spider”

“woman”

“world”

OneTermWithContext Returns two terms such that the last two terms from the input query appear together. “what a wonderful d

“wonderful day”

“wonderful dog”

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28

Jun

Autocomplete in Azure Search now in public preview

Today, we are happy to announce public preview support for autocomplete in Azure Search, one of our most requested features on UserVoice. Autocomplete, also called “type-ahead search”, can enhance the search experience by finding potential terms in the index that match the partial term being written by the user. An example of similar functionality is shown below from bing.com:

 

Autocomplete modes

For autocomplete to work, the fields in the search index should be listed in a suggester. For example, if you define a suggester on a city field, typing “sea” will return terms like “Seattle” or “Seaside” if those terms exist in the city field.

The table below describes the 3 modes supported by Autocomplete and the expected results in each scenario.

Mode Behavior Query Autocompleted results OneTerm Returns a single term which autocompletes the partial term of the query. “what a wo

“women”

“wool”

“world”

TwoTerms Returns a single term and two terms which autocomplete the partial term of the query. “what a wo

“wonderful day”

“wolf spider”

“woman”

“world”

OneTermWithContext Returns two terms such that the last two terms from the input query appear together. “what a wonderful d

“wonderful day”

“wonderful dog”

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28

Jun

Augmented Reality becomes mainstream in Manufacturing, changes the face of the industry

As it’s often the case with new technologies, Augmented Reality (and its more evolved sibling – Mixed Reality)  have attracted a lot of excitement in the tech world and sparked the imaginations of many entrepreneurs. This excitement is easy to understand. This is, after all, a technology that lets us blend the digital with the physical and enhance our senses with super-human capabilities.

However, the value of AR/MR was not immediately obvious to everyone in Manufacturing (we are a skeptical bunch). Early examples of AR/MR applications did not help its case: they showed a group of engineers gathered around a 3D model, waving their hands in the air to virtually pull parts apart and mark things up with “please review this part” virtual notes. The problem with this was that these examples were essentially the same scenarios already beaten to death by VR, with the only apparent difference that engineers used see-through glasses instead of opaque head-mounted devices. So, naturally, people wondered what the big whoop around AR/MR was.

But soon enough folks in the industry realized that the real value of AR/MR was in augmenting the real world with digital information, and not just projecting 3D models in physical

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