Category Archives : Hybrid

11

Feb

Azure Stack IaaS – part one
Azure Stack IaaS – part one

This blog post was co-authored by Daniel Savage, Principal Program Manager, Azure Stack and Tiberiu Radu, Senior Program Manager, Azure Stack.

Azure Stack at its core is an Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) platform

When we discuss Azure Stack with our customers, they see the value in Azure Stack providing cloud-native capabilities to their datacenters. They see the opportunity to modernize their apps and address the unique solutions Azure Stack can deliver, but they often pause as they ponder where to begin. They wonder how to get value from the investments they have in apps currently running on virtual machines (VM). They wonder, “Does Azure Stack help me here? What if I am not quite ready for Platform-as-a-Service?” These questions are difficult, but the answers become more clear when they understand that Azure Stack at its core is an IaaS platform.

Azure Stack allows customers to run their own instance of Azure in their datacenter. Organizations pick Azure Stack as part of their cloud strategy because it helps them handle situations when the public cloud won’t work for them. The three most common reasons use Azure Stack are because of poor network connectivity to the public cloud, regulatory or contractual requirements, or backend

Share

05

Feb

Best practices to consider before deploying a network virtual appliance

A network virtual appliance (NVA) is a virtual appliance primarily focused on network functions virtualization. A typical network virtual appliance involves various layers four to seven functions like firewall, WAN optimizer, application delivery controllers, routers, load balancers, IDS/IPS, proxies, SD-WAN edge, and more. While the public cloud may provide some of these functionalities natively, it is quite common to see customers deploying network virtual appliances from independent software vendors (ISV). These capabilities in the public cloud enable hybrid solutions and are generally available through the Azure Marketplace.

What exactly is the network virtual appliance in the cloud?

A network virtual appliance is often a full Linux virtual machine (VM) image consisting of a Linux kernel and includes user level applications and services. When a VM is created, it first boots the Linux kernel to initialize the system and then starts up any application or management services needed to make the network virtual appliance functional. The cloud provider is responsible for the compute resources, while the ISV provides the image that represents the software stack of the virtual appliance.

Similar to a standard Linux distribution, the Linux kernel is integral to the NVA’s image and is provided by the ISV often

Share

20

Dec

The year in review: Hybrid applications for developers
The year in review: Hybrid applications for developers

As 2018 comes to an end, I look at the technology landscape. I look at the kinds of hybrid scenarios our customers are developing. for example, we see Airbus transforming aerospace with Microsoft Azure Stack and I realize that this year has been amazing for developers that design, develop, and maintain cloud-based apps. Azure Stack has improved support for DevOps practices. You can use Kubernetes containers. You can use API Profiles with Azure Resource Manager and the code of your choice. You can review walkthroughs and tutorials on getting up and running with a development practice using a continuous integration pipeline. With Azure Stack, your apps can be developed in the cloud. You can code once and deploy to environments in Azure or in your local data center.

We are now seeing some of your favorite services from Azure arrive on Azure Stack. The Azure Stack team is also excited to come together with other members of the Azure Edge family, which include Data Box Edge, IoT Edge, and Azure Sphere. If you didn’t get a chance to attend Ignite 2018’s session on the Intellgent Edge check out the “Delivering Intelligent Edge and Microsoft Azure Stack and Data Box” session.

Share

04

Dec

Cincinnati Children’s has a great app development experience with Azure services

The healthcare industry has started to embrace mobile apps and cloud technologies, and not just to optimize internal operations. Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center wants to make visits to hospitals and doctors’ offices easier for patients and families. Cincinnati Children’s serves a diverse population, but people typically have one thing in common—they’re stressed out. Parents are worried about their children, and children can be scared and overwhelmed by all the hustle and bustle around them. So the hospital came up with the idea of a mobile digital concierge who could provide basic information and also answer specific questions about a family’s appointments and the child’s procedures.

The Cincinnati Children’s development team didn’t have expertise building mobile apps, but they did have lots of experience developing in .NET. The team also knew it needed a cloud deployment platform that would support the functionality they had in mind and would also grow with them as they expand and scale the app. Cincinnati Children’s was already using Azure DevOps, so it went with Microsoft Visual Studio Tools for Xamarin for cross-platform app development and chose Azure as its cloud platform. Azure offered a wide variety of services they could use without purchasing third-party

Share

26

Nov

Customers are using Azure Stack to unlock new hybrid cloud innovation

Over the past week, I visited customers and partners in Europe who want to bring cloud services to datacenters and edge locations to deliver new hybrid cloud solutions. Whether it’s due to latency, regulatory compliance or legacy data and systems, these customers can’t use the public cloud for several scenarios. They look for a true hybrid cloud solution to deliver a consistent experience across their entire digital estate. It was really great to listen and observe how some of these companies are already using Azure Stack and thinking of innovative ways to drive digital transformation using Microsoft’s intelligent cloud and intelligent edge approach.

It’s humbling to see customers across government, manufacturing, financial services, and healthcare industries in nearly 60 countries around the world use Azure Stack to unlock new scenarios that were not possible before. And this is just the beginning. We are committed to meeting customer needs and continuously delivering new updates and innovation on Azure Stack.

Consistent hybrid cloud

We have designed and engineered Azure Stack to be truly consistent with Azure. Azure Stack brings the agility and innovation of cloud computing to on-premises and edge, so organizations can build modern apps across their full environment with the

Share

15

Nov

Five lessons for building your roadmap to a secure hybrid cloud future

This blog post is a part of our security series for National Cybersecurity Awareness Month where we discuss how federal CIOs can best prepare for a cloud environment that works securely with your on-premises datacenters.

The need for federal agencies to get their hybrid cloud roadmaps in place has reached a tipping point over the past year, especially as pressures mount to modernize the government’s vast portfolio of aging legacy IT systems and make smarter use of available IT funding.

Agency IT leaders however, face a deeper challenge. Deciding which applications to move to the cloud and which should be rebuilt or replaced to function securely in a hybrid environment. They must do so while planning for a rapidly-changing cybersecurity landscape.

That’s why rationalizing and rightsizing your applications deserves careful attention. This is also why aligning with the right partners who can support your applications, whether in the cloud or on-premises, can be the difference between successful IT modernization versus just lifting-and-shifting to the cloud.

That’s one reason a growing number of agencies are choosing the flexibility and built-in security features of cloud platforms such as Microsoft Azure Government. Azure Government gives leaders a flexible way to test out their

Share

12

Nov

Developing hybrid applications with Azure Stack
Developing hybrid applications with Azure Stack

More and more we hear from our customers that building hybrid applications is necessary for their business. While Microsoft Azure continues to be the platform of choice for building applications, Azure Stack and Azure together enable building hybrid applications. The consistent experience across both makes it easy. You can use Azure services from anywhere, whether at the bottom of a mine, from inside a container on a cargo ship in the middle of the Pacific Ocean, or from the top of Aconcagua, the tallest mountain in the Andes. Literally, you can run apps that you developed in Azure any place where traditional data centers don’t exist.

You can use Azure Stack close to your operations while using your favorite tools and programming language. Push your apps through dev, test, and into production with a single integrated DevOps pipeline.

Nothing illustrates the power of hybrid apps like the disaster relief prototype my team designed and implemented. This is a great demo of Azure services in a mobile deployment, disconnected in a remote environment. The solution supports data collection and decision making, and we can also see it being tested in areas such as healthcare.

Azure Stack offers capabilities today that make

Share

25

Sep

Red Hat OpenShift and Microsoft Azure Stack together for hybrid enterprise solutions

Red Hat and Microsoft expand partnership to offer complete combined hybrid cloud solutions – jointly supported and in market today.

This week at Ignite in Orlando, Microsoft and Red Hat demonstrated their solution for hybrid enterprise container platforms – OpenShift Container Platform for Microsoft Azure Stack. This solution has joint support from Microsoft and Red Hat and was first announced earlier this year in May.

Microsoft and Red Hat are both committed to customer solutions that span on-premises and public cloud.  Together, Azure and Azure Stack deliver the industry’s only truly consistent and comprehensive hybrid cloud platform, which enables a unified approach to application development. OpenShift Container Platform is Red Hat’s container application platform, bringing Docker and Kubernetes to the enterprise and creating consistent solutions both on-premises and in the cloud.

OpenShift and Azure Stack present exciting new options for customers who use Microsoft and Red Hat technologies and offer the greatest possible flexibility and consistency where these solutions are run and managed – whether its in the public cloud or on-premises with Azure Stack. OpenShift and Azure Stack enable a consistent application experience across Azure, Azure Stack, bare-metal, Windows and RHEL bringing together Microsoft’s and Red Hat’s developer frameworks

Share

27

Aug

Sharing a self-hosted Integration Runtime infrastructure with multiple Data Factories

The Integration Runtime (IR) is the compute infrastructure used by Azure Data Factory to provide data integration capabilities across different network environments. If you need to perform data integration and orchestration securely in a private network environment, which does not have a direct line-of-sight from the public cloud environment, you can install a self-hosted IR on premises behind your corporate firewall, or inside a virtual private network.

Untill now, you were required to create at least one such compute infrastructure in every Data Factory by design for hybrid and on-premise data integration capabilities. Which implies if you have ten such data factories being used by different project teams to access on-premise data stores and orchestrate inside VNet, you would have to create ten self-hosted IR infrastructures, adding additional cost and management concerns to the IT teams.

With the new capability of self-hosted IR sharing, you can share the same self-hosted IR infrastructure across data factories. This lets you reuse the same highly available and scalable self-hosted IR infrastructure from different data factories within the same Azure Active Directory tenant. We are introducing a new concept of a Linked self-hosted IR which references another self-hosted IR infrastructure. This does not introduce

Share

27

Aug

Sharing a self-hosted Integration Runtime infrastructure with multiple Data Factories

The Integration Runtime (IR) is the compute infrastructure used by Azure Data Factory to provide data integration capabilities across different network environments. If you need to perform data integration and orchestration securely in a private network environment, which does not have a direct line-of-sight from the public cloud environment, you can install a self-hosted IR on premises behind your corporate firewall, or inside a virtual private network.

Untill now, you were required to create at least one such compute infrastructure in every Data Factory by design for hybrid and on-premise data integration capabilities. Which implies if you have ten such data factories being used by different project teams to access on-premise data stores and orchestrate inside VNet, you would have to create ten self-hosted IR infrastructures, adding additional cost and management concerns to the IT teams.

With the new capability of self-hosted IR sharing, you can share the same self-hosted IR infrastructure across data factories. This lets you reuse the same highly available and scalable self-hosted IR infrastructure from different data factories within the same Azure Active Directory tenant. We are introducing a new concept of a Linked self-hosted IR which references another self-hosted IR infrastructure. This does not introduce

Share