Category Archives : Management

01

Jun

Whether you’re a new student, a thriving startup, or the largest enterprise, you have financial constraints, and you need to know what you’re spending, where, and how to plan for the future. Nobody wants a surprise when it comes to the bill, and this is where Azure Cost Management and Billing comes in.

We’re always looking for ways to learn more about your challenges and how Azure Cost Management and Billing can help you better understand where you’re accruing costs in the cloud, identify and prevent bad spending patterns, and optimize costs to empower you to do more with less. Here are a few of the latest improvements and updates based on your feedback:

Expanded support for cost allocation across APIs and downloads. Management group exports in Azure Government. Reminder: Cloudyn retiring on June 30. Selecting relative dates in the cost analysis preview. Help improve usability for Azure reservation and savings features. What’s new in Cost Management Labs. New ways to save money with Azure. New videos and learning opportunities. Documentation updates.

Let’s dig into the details.

 

Expanded support for cost allocation across APIs and downloads

From

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26

May

Customers around the world take advantage of Microsoft Azure to build, deploy, and manage business-critical applications at scale. We continuously innovate to help customers simplify their app deployment and management experience so they can spend more time building great solutions. Today, we are announcing several additional Azure infrastructure capabilities to help achieve this goal.

Simplify your declarative deployment experience in Azure with Bicep

With developers depending heavily on cloud infrastructure to run the apps they create, we continuously strive to simplify the infrastructure setup experience so they can stay focused on the actual innovation and experiences they are crafting within their apps. Azure Resource Manager (ARM) templates are extremely powerful; however, they can be complex. Bicep, an open-source, domain-specific language (DSL), further simplifies developers’ declarative deployment experience in Azure. Bicep makes it much easier to both read and write infrastructure-as-code in Azure.

Bicep allows customers to deploy Azure resources with many of the conveniences of modern programming languages—now indispensable to any app developer’s workflow. It supports first-class tooling with Visual Studio Code integration and has features such as type safety, modularity, and concise, readable syntax. Bicep is a transparent abstraction over ARM templates, which means everything you can do in

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20

May

I’m announcing that Azure has achieved adherence to the EU Cloud Code of Conduct (EU Cloud CoC), developed for cloud providers to align with the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The EU Cloud CoC is the first GDPR code of conduct that has received the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) positive opinion, which was followed by final approval led by the Belgian Data Protection Authority. The EU Cloud CoC also marks the 100th compliance offering for Azure, more than any other cloud provider, providing customers a high level of assurance through controls, evidence, and verification.

The EU Cloud CoC serves as a basis for implementing the requirements of Article 28 of the GDPR for cloud providers acting as business-to-business processors under the GDPR. Because the EU Cloud CoC is approved by the EDPB, Azure customers can use Azure’s adherence to help demonstrate their own GDPR compliance, as well as cite it as a risk mitigator in a GDPR Data Protection Impact Assessment (DPIA). Article 40 of the GDPR specifically encourages the creation of codes of conduct, so as “to contribute to the proper application of the regulation.” SCOPE Europe acts as the independent monitoring body of the EU Cloud CoC.

“This

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27

Apr

Whether you’re a new student, a thriving startup, or the largest enterprise, you have financial constraints, and you need to know what you’re spending, where, and how to plan for the future. Nobody wants a surprise when it comes to the bill, and this is where Azure Cost Management and Billing comes in.

We’re always looking for ways to learn more about your challenges and how Azure Cost Management and Billing can help you better understand where you’re accruing costs in the cloud, identify and prevent bad spending patterns, and optimize costs to empower you to do more with less. Here are a few of the latest improvements and updates based on your feedback:

Get retail prices in non-USD currencies. New date picker in the cost analysis preview. What’s new in Cost Management Labs. Deploy key design principles with enterprise-scale architecture. Empowering operators on their cloud migration journey. New ways to save money with Azure. New videos and learning opportunities. Documentation updates.

Let’s dig into the details.

 

Get retail prices in non-USD currencies

In September 2020, you learned about the new Retail Prices API and how it gives

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06

Apr

This post was co-authored by Sarah Lean, Senior Content Engineer, Azure

In the last couple of blog posts, we followed Tailwind Traders1 on their cloud journey and how the IT team is looking to adopt Azure as part of their IT strategy. After researching what they need to do in order to run their workloads within Azure, they started to use the Microsoft Cloud Adoption Framework for Azure and Azure landing zones. This blog will discuss the IT team at Tailwind Traders and how they leveraged enterprise-scale reference implementations for the cloud environment they are building.

Enterprise-scale landing zone architecture provides a strategic design path and target technical state for your Azure environment, including enterprise enrollment, identity, network topology, resource organization, governance, operations, business continuity, and disaster recovery (BCDR), as well as deployment options. These landing zones follow design principles across the critical design areas for an organization’s Azure environment and aligns with Azure platform roadmaps to ensure that new capabilities can be integrated.

Tailwind Traders takes advantage of prescriptive guidance coupled with best practices for your Azure control plane by using the enterprise-scale architecture.

Cloud Adoption Framework enterprise-scale landing zone architecture

The enterprise-landing zone architecture offers a modular design,

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05

Apr

This post was co-authored by Altaf Tambawala, Principal Program Manager, Azure

Today, we are announcing the general availability of Cloud Services (extended support), which is a new Azure Resource Manager (ARM)-based deployment model for Azure Cloud Services. The platform-supported tool for migrating existing cloud services to Cloud Services (extended support) also goes into preview today.

Cloud Services (extended support) has the primary benefit of providing regional resiliency along with feature parity with Azure Cloud Services deployed using Azure Service Manager (ASM). It also offers some ARM capabilities such as role-based access and control (RBAC), tags, policy, private link support, and use of deployment templates.

The ASM-based deployment model for Cloud Services has been renamed Cloud Services (classic). Customers retain the ability to build and rapidly deploy web and cloud applications and services. Customers will be able to scale cloud services infrastructure based on current demand and ensure that the performance of applications can keep up while simultaneously reducing costs. Migrating to ARM will allow customers to set up a robust infrastructure platform for their applications.

Available migration paths

Cloud Services (extended support) provides two paths for customers to migrate from ASM to ARM:

Re-deploy: Customers can deploy a

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31

Mar

Tailwind Traders1 is a retail company that is looking to adopt Azure as part of its IT strategy. The IT team is familiar with deploying infrastructure on premises and is now researching what they need to do in order to run their workloads within Azure. They’ve been doing some research and have found the Microsoft Cloud Adoption Framework for Azure and Azure landing zones.

When embarking on any project or new implementation, there are always key design and decision points to be discussed and fully understood. Deploying an enterprise-scale landing zone and subsequent resources to the cloud is no different. The enterprise-scale architecture prescribed in this guidance is based on the design principles that serve as a compass for subsequent design decisions across critical technical domains.

The Tailwind Traders IT team is sitting down to discuss the critical design areas as laid out within the enterprise-scale landing zone documentation. There are several areas that they need to discuss:

Enterprise Agreement (EA) enrolment and Azure Active Directory tenants Identity and access management Management group and subscription organization Network topology and connectivity Management and monitoring Business continuity and disaster recovery Security, governance, and compliance Platform automation and DevOps Subscriptions

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30

Mar

Whether you’re a new student, a thriving startup, or the largest enterprise, you have financial constraints, and you need to know what you’re spending, where, and how to plan for the future. Nobody wants a surprise when it comes to the bill, and this is where Azure Cost Management and Billing comes in.

We’re always looking for ways to learn more about your challenges and how Azure Cost Management and Billing can help you better understand where you’re accruing costs in the cloud, identify and prevent bad spending patterns, and optimize costs to empower you to do more with less. Here are a few of the latest improvements and updates based on your feedback:

Prevent exceeding your budget with forecasted cost alerts New cost view for subscriptions What’s new in Cost Management Labs Demystifying cloud economics New ways to save money with Azure New videos and learning opportunities Documentation updates

Let’s dig into the details.

 

Prevent exceeding your budget with forecasted cost alerts

Staying on top of your costs is critical. Luckily, you can easily set up predefined alerts as you approach your budget in Azure Cost Management and Billing. Now you can define alerts based

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25

Mar

This post was co-authored by Sarah Lean, Senior Content Engineer, Azure

Tailwind Traders1 is a retail company that is looking to adopt Azure as part of its IT strategy. The IT team is familiar with deploying infrastructure on-premises and is now researching what they need to do in order to run their workloads on Azure. In this blog post, we will walk you through Tailwind Traders’ experience to run its workloads on Azure using Cloud Adoption Framework and Azure landing zones guidance.

What are enterprise-scale landing zones?

In a previous blog post, we followed Tailwind Traders and their cloud adoption journey, where we learned about the Cloud Adoption Framework and Azure landing zones. After researching the different landing zone options—start small and expand, enterprise-scale, and partner landing zones—Tailwind Traders has decided to start with the enterprise-scale architecture.

Tailwind Traders requires an initial implementation of landing zones with fully integrated governance, security, and operations from the start. The enterprise-scale architecture provides prescriptive guidance coupled with Azure best practices, developed largely by Microsoft architects and the broader Cloud Solutions Unit technical community. It follows design principles across the critical design areas for an organization’s Azure environment, like enterprise enrollment, identity, network topology,

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25

Mar

For any organization running big data workloads in the cloud, exceptional scale, performance, and optimization are essential. Databricks customers have multiple choices for their cloud destination. Azure Databricks is the only first-party service offering for Databricks, which provides customers with distinct benefits not offered in any other cloud. The first-party integration and our unique strategic alliance saves customers time and effort and significantly accelerates time to value. As Forrester notes, “Competitive advantage is no longer about ‘first to market’, it’s [now about] ‘first to value’”1.

Azure Databricks enables customers to be first to value for these five reasons:

Unique engineering partnership Mission-critical support and ease for commerce Azure ecosystem Native security, identity, and compliance Rapid onboarding 1. Unique engineering partnership

The Azure and Databricks engineering teams are constantly working together to deepen the integration of Databricks within Azure to enable rapid customer success. In fact, both engineering teams have spent hundreds of thousands of hours optimizing Databricks for Azure. This collaboration drives a highly performant level of cloud-scale operations that would not be possible without this unique engineering partnership. The engineering teams work together to enhance the performance and scalability, monitor environments and provide business-critical support. Since

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