Category Archives : Monitoring

05

Nov

Best practices for alerting on metrics with Azure Database for PostgreSQL monitoring

Whether you are a developer, database administrator, site reliability engineer, or a DevOps professional, monitoring databases is an important part of maintaining the reliability, availability, and performance of your PostgreSQL server. There are various metrics available for you in Microsoft Azure Database for PostgreSQL to get insights on the behavior of the server. You can also set alerts on these metrics using the Azure portal or Azure CLI.

With modern applications evolving from a traditional on-premises approach to becoming more hybrid or cloud-native, there is also a need to adopt some best practices for a successful monitoring strategy on a hybrid and public cloud. Here are some example best practices for using monitoring data on your PostgreSQL server, and areas you can consider improving based on these various metrics.

Active connections

Sample threshold (percentage or value): 80 percent of total connection limit for greater than or equal to 30 minutes, checked every five minutes.

Things to check: If you notice that active connections are at 80 percent of the total limit for the past half hour, verify if this is expected based on the workload. If you think the load is expected, active connections limit can be increased by

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05

Nov

Best practices for alerting on metrics with Azure Database for MySQL monitoring

Whether you are a developer, database administrator, site reliability engineer, or a DevOps professional, monitoring databases is an important part of maintaining the reliability, availability, and performance of your PostgreSQL server. There are various metrics available for you in Microsoft Azure Database for MySQL to get insights on the behavior of the server. You can also set alerts on these metrics using the Azure portal or Azure CLI.

With modern applications evolving from a traditional on-premises approach to becoming more hybrid or cloud-native, there is also a need to adopt some best practices for a successful monitoring strategy on a hybrid and public cloud. Here are some example best practices on how you can use monitoring data on your MySQL server, and areas you can consider improving based on these various metrics.

Active connections

Sample threshold (percentage or value): 80 percent of total connection limit for greater than or equal to 30 minutes, checked every five minutes.

Things to check: If you notice that active connections are at 80 percent of the total limit for the past half hour, verify if this is expected based on the workload. If you think the load is expected, active connections limit can

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22

Oct

Seven best practices for Continuous Monitoring with Azure Monitor

Whether you are a developer, site reliability engineer, IT Ops specialist, program manager, or a DevOps practitioner monitoring is something you definitely care about! With modern applications evolving from an on-premises world to becoming more hybrid or microservices based, there is also a need to evolve skill sets and adopt some best practices for a successful monitoring strategy on a hybrid/public cloud.

Azure Monitor is Microsoft’s unified monitoring solution that provides full-stack observability across applications and infrastructure. Depending on the hat you are wearing at the moment, you can start with end-to-end visibility across the health of your resources, drill down to the most probable root cause of a problem, even to actual lines of code, fix the issue in your app or infrastructure, and re-deploy in a matter of minutes. If you have a robust monitoring pipeline setup, you should be able to find and fix issues way before it starts impacting your customers.

Continuous Monitoring

Many of you already know how Continuous Integration and Continuous Deployment (CI/CD) as a DevOps concept can help you deliver software faster and more reliably to provide continuous value to your users. Continuous Monitoring (CM) is a new follow-up concept where you can

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25

Sep

Azure Monitor alerting just got better!
Azure Monitor alerting just got better!

In March 2018, we announced the next generation of alerts in Azure. Since then, we have received overwhelming feedback from you appreciating the new capabilities and providing asks for the next set of enhancements. Today, I am happy to announce exciting new developments in Azure Monitor alerts.

One Alerts experience

The unified alerts experience in Azure Monitor just got better! We are introducing the unified experience in all major services in Azure, complemented with the One Metrics and One Logs experience to provide you quick access to these capabilities.

As part of the alerts experience, we’re introducing new ways to visualize and manage alerts, providing a bird’s eye view to all alerts across subscriptions by severity, a drill down view into all the alerts and a detailed view to examine each alert. This is complemented by Smart Groups (preview), which automatically consolidates multiple alerts into a single group using advanced AI techniques. Using these capabilities, you can troubleshoot issues in your environment quickly.

 

Expanded coverage

We are expanding alerting coverage to include more Azure services including web apps, functions and slots, custom metrics, and standard and webtest for Azure Monitor Application Insights.

The alerts experience now also

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25

Sep

A new way to send custom metrics to Azure Monitor
A new way to send custom metrics to Azure Monitor

In today’s world of modern applications, metrics play a key role in helping you understand how your apps, services, and the infrastructure they run on, are performing. They can help you detect, investigate, and diagnose issues when they crop up. To provide you this level of visibility Azure has made resource-level platform metrics available via Azure Monitor. However, many of you need to collect more metrics, and unlock deeper insights about the resources and applications you are running in your hybrid environment.

To accomplish this, you have already been able to send custom metrics from your apps via Application Insights SDKs. Today, we are happy to announce the public preview of custom metrics in Azure Monitor, now enabling you to submit metrics, collected anywhere, for any Azure resource. These metrics can be additional performance indicators, like Memory Utilization, about your resources; or business-related metrics emitted by your application, like page load times. As part of the unified metric experience in Azure Monitor, now you can:

Send custom metrics with up to 10 dimensions Categorize and segregate metrics using namespaces Leverage a unified set of metrics and alerts experiences via Azure Monitor Plot custom metrics alongside your resources’ platform metrics in

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25

Sep

Manage Azure Monitor using Java
Manage Azure Monitor using Java

Azure Monitor maximizes the availability and performance of your applications by delivering an end-to-end monitoring solution for collecting, analyzing, and acting on telemetry from your cloud and on-premises environments. It helps you understand how your applications are performing and proactively identifies issues affecting them and the resources they depend on. Today, we released version 1.16 of the Azure Management Libraries for Java. Now you can programmatically manage Azure Monitor using Azure Management Libraries for Java, specifically, you can:

Manage Diagnostic Settings Stream logs and metrics to Event Hub, Storage Account or Log Analytics Query Metrics Set up Metric Alerts Query Activity Logs Set up Activity Log Alerts Setup Auto Scale Perform Advanced Analytics

If you you’re ready to dive right in, go to the Azure Management Libraries for Java GitHub repo:

Getting started

Add the following dependency fragment to your Maven POM file to use 1.16 version of the libraries:

<dependency> <groupId>com.microsoft.azure</groupId> <artifactId>azure</artifactId> <version>1.16.0</version> </dependency> Stream Azure Service Logs and Metrics through Event Hub

Azure diagnostic logs – service and app logs from managed Azure services and resources – can be streamed in near real-time to any third-party logging and telemetry systems of your choice, such as Elastic Stack,

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11

Sep

Application Insights improvements for Java and Node.js
Application Insights improvements for Java and Node.js

Did you know that Application Insights supports Java and Node.js? That’s because at Microsoft our mission is to empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more. For those of us on the Azure Application Insights team, every person means every developer, DevOps practitioner and site reliability engineer – regardless of the tech stack that they use.

That’s why we’ve been working for over a year now to enable Java and Node.js teams to have a first-class monitoring experience in both their Azure and on-premises environments. So today I’m proud to share with you some of what our team has already accomplished, and I’m excited about the features and improvements that we will be continuing to release over the next several months. But first, let’s talk about Java.

Application Insights for Java

The second version of our Application Insights for Java SDK was released to Maven/Gradle and GitHub earlier this year, and the team has continued to crank out improvements since then, most recently with version 2.1.2. In addition to a myriad of bug fixes, the team has also added support for fixed rate sampling, enhanced support for Log4J, and cross-component telemetry correlation. We also auto

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02

Aug

Automatic intelligent insights to optimize performance with SQL Data Warehouse

We are excited to announce that SQL Data Warehouse (SQL DW) serves you intelligent performance insights within the Azure portal! SQL DW is a flexible, secure, and fully managed analytics platform for the enterprise optimized for running complex queries fast across petabytes of data.

Continuously delivering on fully managed experiences, customers no longer need to monitor their data warehouse to detect data skew and suboptimal table statistics with this release. Data skew and suboptimal table statistics are common issues that can degrade the performance of your data warehouse if left unchecked. At no additional cost, SQL DW surfaces intelligent insights for all Gen2 data warehouses and is tightly integrated with Azure Advisor to deliver you best practice recommendations. SQL DW analyzes your data warehouse collecting telemetry and surfaces recommendations based on your active workload. This analysis happens on a daily cadence where you can download recommendations, configure certain subscriptions to be analyzed, or postpone recommendations from being generated.

To check for recommendations, visit the Azure Advisor portal:

To generate these recommendations yourself, you can run the following T-SQL script and identify the specific tables being impacted by skew and statistics. For feedback on recommendations, please reach out

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24

Jul

Top feature requests added with Azure Blockchain Workbench 1.2.0

We’re excited to see a ton of engagement and positive feedback on Azure Blockchain Workbench since our initial public preview release in May. Last month, we made our first major update to the public preview release based on your feedback and feature requests. Today, we’re releasing our next update to Workbench, which we’re calling version 1.2.0. You can either deploy a new instance of Workbench through the Azure Portal or upgrade your existing deployment to 1.2.0 using our upgrade script.

This update includes the following improvements:

Enable/disable apps

Many of you have started to iterate and create multiple blockchain apps using Workbench. One of the most requested features we’ve heard is the ability to disable unused blockchain apps within the Workbench Web app. With 1.2.0, you will be able to enable or disable applications. In addition, the UI will allow you to filter the list of applications to only show enabled or disabled applications.

BYOB – Bring Your Own Blockchain

As part of the Workbench deployment, we deploy a set of Ethereum Proof-of Authority (PoA) nodes within a single member’s subscription. This topology works great for situations where it’s OK to have one member manage all the blockchain

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24

Jul

Top feature requests added with Azure Blockchain Workbench 1.2.0

We’re excited to see a ton of engagement and positive feedback on Azure Blockchain Workbench since our initial public preview release in May. Last month, we made our first major update to the public preview release based on your feedback and feature requests. Today, we’re releasing our next update to Workbench, which we’re calling version 1.2.0. You can either deploy a new instance of Workbench through the Azure Portal or upgrade your existing deployment to 1.2.0 using our upgrade script.

This update includes the following improvements:

Enable/disable apps

Many of you have started to iterate and create multiple blockchain apps using Workbench. One of the most requested features we’ve heard is the ability to disable unused blockchain apps within the Workbench Web app. With 1.2.0, you will be able to enable or disable applications. In addition, the UI will allow you to filter the list of applications to only show enabled or disabled applications.

BYOB – Bring Your Own Blockchain

As part of the Workbench deployment, we deploy a set of Ethereum Proof-of Authority (PoA) nodes within a single member’s subscription. This topology works great for situations where it’s OK to have one member manage all the blockchain

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