Category Archives : Virtual Machines

20

Mar

Windows Virtual Desktop now in public preview on Azure

We recently shared the public preview of the Windows Virtual Desktop service on Azure. Now customers can access the only service that delivers simplified management, multi-session Windows 10, optimizations for Office 365 ProPlus, and support for Windows Server Remote Desktop Services (RDS) desktops and apps. With Windows Virtual Desktop, you can deploy and scale your Windows desktops and apps on Azure in minutes, while enjoying built-in security and compliance.

This means customers can now virtualize using multi-session Windows 10, Windows 7, and Windows Server desktops and apps (RDS) to Windows Virtual Desktop for a simplified management and deployment experience with Azure. We also built Windows Virtual Desktop as an extensible solution for our partners, including Citrix, Samsung, and Microsoft Cloud Solution Providers (CSP).

Access to Windows Virtual Desktop is available through applicable RDS and Windows Enterprise licenses. With the appropriate license, you just need to set up an Azure subscription to get started today. You can choose the type of virtual machines and storage you want to suit your environment. You can optimize costs by taking advantage of Reserved Instances with up to a 72 percent discount and using multi-session Windows 10.

You can read more detail about Windows

Share

20

Mar

Azure Stack IaaS – part five

Self-service is core to Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS). Back in the virtualization days, you had to wait for someone to create a VLAN for you, carve out a LUN, and find space on a host. If Microsoft Azure ran that way, we would have needed to hire more and more admins as our cloud business grew.

Do it yourself

A different approach was required, which is why IaaS is important. Azure’s IaaS gives the owner of the subscription everything they need to create virtual machines (VMs) and other resources on their own, without involving an administrator. To learn more visit our documentation, “Introduction to Azure Virtual Machines” and “Introduction to Azure Stack virtual machines.”

Let me give you a few examples that show Azure and Azure Stack self-service management of VMs.

Deployment

Creating a VM is as simple as going through a wizard. You can create the VM by specifying everything needed for the VM in the “Create virtual machine” blade. You can include the operating system image or marketplace template, the size (memory, CPUs, number of disks, and NICs), high availability, storage, networking, monitoring, and even in guest configuration.

Learn more by visiting the following resources:

Deploy Azure Linux VM

Share

18

Mar

Azure Data Studio: An Open Source GUI Editor for Postgres

When you are working with a database, or any other kind of software, your experience is enhanced or hindered by the tools you use to interact with it. PostgreSQL has a command line tool, psql, and it’s pretty powerful, but some people much prefer a graphical editor. Even if you typically use command line, you may want to go visual sometimes. At Microsoft we’ve spent many years building experiences to enhance developers’ day-to-day productivity. Having choices is important. It allows you to go with the tool that works for you.

Today we’re excited to announce preview support for PostgreSQL in Azure Data Studio. Azure Data Studio is a cross-platform modern editor focused on data development. It’s available for Linux, MacOS, and Windows. Plus, Azure Data Studio comes with an integrated terminal so you’re never far away from psql.

We’re also introducing a corresponding preview PostgreSQL extension in Visual Studio Code (VS Code). Both Azure Data Studio and VS Code are open source and extensible – two things that PostgreSQL itself is based on.

Azure Data Studio inherits a lot of VS Code functionality. It also supports most of VS Code’s extensions like Python, R, and Kubernetes support. If your primary

Share

18

Mar

Azure Container Registry virtual network and Firewall rules preview support

While Azure Container Registry (ACR) supports user and headless-service account authentication, customers have expressed their requirements for limiting public endpoint access. Customers can now limit registry access within an Azure Virtual Network (VNet), as well as whitelist IP addresses and ranges for on-premises services.

VNet and Firewall rules are supported with virtual machines (VM) and Azure Kubernetes Services (AKS).

Choosing between private and PaaS registries

As customers move into production, their security teams have a checklist they apply to production workloads, one of which is limiting all public endpoints. Without VNet support, customers had to choose between standalone products, or OSS projects they could run and manage themselves. This puts a larger burden on the customers to manage the storage, security, scalability, and reliability a production registry requires.

With VNet and Firewall rules, customers can achieve their security requirements, while benefiting from integrated security, secured at rest, geo-redundant, and geo-replicated PaaS Container Registry. Thus, freeing up their resources to focus on the unique business problems they face.

Azure Container Registry PaaS, enabling registry products

The newest VNet and Firewall rule capabilities of ACR are just the latest set of capabilities in container lifecycle management. ACR provides core primitives that

Share

18

Mar

Azure Backup for SQL Server in Azure Virtual Machines now generally available!

How do you back up your SQL Servers today? You could be using backup software that require you to manage backup servers, agents, and storage, or you could be writing elaborate custom scripts which need you to manage the backups on each server individually. With the modernization of IT infrastructure and the world rapidly moving to the cloud, do you want to continue using the legacy backup methods that are tedious, infrastructure-heavy, and difficult to scale? Azure Backup for SQL Server Virtual Machines (VMs) is the modern way of doing backup in cloud, and we are excited to announce that it is now generally available! It is an enterprise scale, zero-infrastructure solution that eliminates the need to deploy and manage backup infrastructure while providing a simple and consistent experience to centrally manage and monitor the backups on standalone SQL instances and Always On Availability Groups.

 

Built into Azure, the solution combines the core cloud promises of simplicity, scalability, security and cost effectiveness with inherent SQL backup capabilities that are leveraged by using native APIs, to yield high fidelity backups and restores. The key value propositions of this solution are:

15-minute Recovery Point Objective (RPO): Working with uber critical

Share

11

Mar

Azure Stack IaaS – part four

Protect your stuff

In this post, we’ll cover the concepts and best practices to protect your IaaS virtual machines (VMs) on Azure Stack. This post is part of the Azure Stack Considerations for Business Continuity and Disaster Recovery white paper.

Protecting your IaaS virtual machine based applications

Azure Stack is an extension of Azure that lets you deliver IaaS Azure services from your organization’s datacenter. Consuming IaaS services from Azure Stack requires a modern approach to business continuity and disaster recovery (BC/DR). If you’re just starting your journey with Azure and Azure Stack, make sure to work through a comprehensive BC/DR strategy so your organization understands the immediate and long-term impact of modernizing applications in the context of cloud. If you already have Azure Stack, keep in mind that each application must have a well-articulated BC/DR plan calling out the resiliency, reliability, and availability requirements that meet the business needs of your organization.

What Azure Stack is and what it isn’t

Since launching Azure Stack at Ignite 2017, we’ve received feedback from many customers on the challenges they face within their organization evangelizing Azure Stack to their end customers. The main concerns are the stark differences from traditional virtualization. In

Share

08

Mar

Azure Stack IaaS – part 3
Azure Stack IaaS – part 3

This blog post was co-authored by David Armour Principal PM Manager, Azure Stack and Tiberiu Radu, Senior Program Manager, Azure Stack.​

Foundation of Azure Stack IaaS

Remember back in the virtualization days when you had to pick a host for your virtual machine? Some of my business units could tell by the naming convention the make and manufacturer of the hardware. Using this knowledge, they’d fill up the better gear first, leaving the teams that didn’t know better with the oldest hosts.

Clouds take a different approach. Instead of hosts, VMs are placed into a pool of capacity. The physical infrastructure is abstract. The compute, storage, and networking resources consumed by the VM are defined through software.

Azure Stack is an instance of the Azure cloud that you can run in your own datacenter. Microsoft has taken the experience and technology from running one of the largest clouds in the world to design a solution you can host in your facility. This forms the foundation of Azure Stack’s infrastructure-as-service (IaaS).

Let’s explore some of the characteristics of the Azure Stack infrastructure that allows you to run cloud-native VMs directly in your facility.

Cloud inspired hardware

Microsoft employees can’t just purchase

Share

04

Mar

Service Fabric Processor in public preview

Microsoft clients for Azure Event Hubs have always had two levels of abstraction. There is the low-level client, which includes event sender and receiver classes which allow for maximum control by the application, but also force the application to understand the configuration of the Event Hub and maintain an event receiver connected to each partition. Built on top of that low-level client is a higher-level library, Event Processor Host, which hides most of those details for the receiving side. Event Processor Host automatically distributes ownership of Event Hub partitions across multiple host instances and delivers events to a processing method provided by the application.

Service Fabric is another Microsoft-provided library, which is a generalized framework for dividing an application into shards and distributing those shards across multiple compute nodes. Many customers are using Service Fabric for their applications, and some of those applications need to receive events from an Event Hub. It is possible to use Event Processor Host within a Service Fabric application, but it is also inelegant and redundant. The combination means that there are two separate layers attempting to distribute load across nodes, and neither one is aware of the other. It also introduces a dependency on

Share

26

Feb

Announcing Azure Integration Service Environment for Logic Apps

A new way to integrate with resources in your virtual network

We strive with every service to provide experiences that significantly improve the development experience. We’re always looking for common pain points that everybody building software in the cloud deals with. And once we find those pain points, we build best-of-class software to address the need.

In critical business scenarios, you need to have the confidence that your data is flowing between all the moving parts. The core Logic Apps offering is a great, multi-faceted service for integrating between data sources and services, but sometimes it is necessary to have dedicated service to ensure that your integration processes are as performant as can be. That’s why we developed the Integration Service Environment (ISE), a fully isolated integration environment.

What is an Integration Service Environment?

An Integration Service Environment is a fully isolated and dedicated environment for all enterprise-scale integration needs. When you create a new Integration Service Environment, it is injected into your Azure virtual network, which allows you to deploy Logic Apps as a service on your VNET.

Direct, secure access to your virtual network resources. Enables Logic Apps to have secure, direct access to private resources, such as

Share

26

Feb

Instantly restore your Azure Virtual Machines using Azure Backup

Today, we are delighted to share the release of Azure Backup Instant Restore capability for Azure Virtual Machines (VMs). Instant Restore helps Azure Backup customers quickly recover VMs from the snapshots stored along with the disks. In addition, users get complete flexibility in configuring the retention range of snapshots at the backup policy level depending on the requirements and criticality of the virtual machines associated, giving users more granular control over their resources.

Key benefits Instant recovery point: Snapshots taken as a part of the backup job are stored along with the disk and are available for recovery instantly. This eliminates the wait time for snapshots to copy to the vault before a restore can be triggered. In-place restore capability: With instant restore, users also get a capability to perform in-place restore, thus, overwriting the data in the original disk rather than creating a copy of the disk at an alternate location. It is particularly useful in scenarios where there is a need to rollback a patch. Once the snapshot phase is done, users can go ahead and use the local snapshot to restore if the patch goes bad. Flexibility to choose retention range for snapshots at backup policy level:

Share