Category Archives : Web

18

Jul

https://azure.microsoft.com/blog/how-hsbc-built-its-payme-for-business-app-on-microsoft-azure/Bank-grade security, super-fast transactions, and analytics  If you live in Asia or have ever traveled there, you’ve probably witnessed the dramatic impact that mobile technology has had on all aspects of day to day life. In Hong Kong in particular, READ MORE

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18

Jul

Making it easier to bring your Linux based web apps to Azure App Service

Application development has radically changed over the years. From having to host all the physical hardware hosting the app and its dependences on-premises, to moving to a model where the hardware is hosted by external companies yet still managed by the users on to hosting your apps on a fully managed platform where all hardware and software management is done by the hosting provider. And then finally over to a full serverless solution where no resources need to be set up to run applications.

The perception of complexity in running smaller solutions in the cloud are slowly being eradicated due to moving solutions to a managed platform, where even non-technical audiences can manage their application in the cloud.

A great example in the managed platform realm is Azure App Service. Azure App Service provides an easy way to bring source code or containers and deploy full web apps in minutes, with the ease of configuration settings at the hands of the app owner. Built in features such as secure sockets layer (SSL) certificates, custom domains, auto-scaling, setting up a continuous integration and deployment (CI/CD) pipeline, diagnostics, troubleshooting, and much more, provides a powerful platform for full cycle build and

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27

Jun

Leveraging complex data to build advanced search applications with Azure Search

Data is rarely simple. Not every piece of data we have can fit nicely into a single Excel worksheet of rows and columns. Data has many diverse relationships such as the multiple locations and phone numbers for a single customer or multiple authors and genres of a single book. Of course, relationships typically are even more complex than this, and as we start to leverage AI to understand our data the additional learnings we get only add to the complexity of relationships. For that reason, expecting customers to have to flatten the data so it can be searched and explored is often unrealistic. We heard this often and it quickly became our number one most requested Azure Search feature. Because of this we were excited to announce the general availability of complex types support in Azure Search. In this post, I want to take some time to explain what complex types adds to Azure Search and the kinds of things you can build using this capability. 

Azure Search is a platform as a service that helps developers create their own cloud search solutions.

What is complex data?

Complex data consists of data that includes hierarchical or nested substructures that do

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11

Jun

Taking advantage of the new Azure Application Gateway V2

We recently released Azure Application Gateway V2 and Web Application Firewall (WAF) V2. These SKUs are named Standard_v2 and WAF_v2 respectively and are fully supported with a 99.95% SLA. The new SKUs offer significant improvements and additional capabilities to customers:

Autoscaling allows elasticity for your application by scaling the application gateway as needed based on your application’s traffic pattern. You no longer need to run application gateway at peak provisioned capacity, thus significantly saving on the cost. Zone redundancy enables your application gateway to survive zonal failures, offering better resilience to your application Static VIP feature ensures that your endpoint address will not change over its lifecycle Header Rewrite allows you to add, remove or update HTTP request and response headers on your application gateway, thus enabling various scenarios such as HSTS support, securing cookies, changing cache controls etc. without the need to touch your application code. Faster provisioning and configuration update time Improved performance for your application gateway helps reduce overall cost

We highly recommend that customers use the V2 SKUs instead of the V1 SKU for new applications/workloads.

Customers who have existing applications behind the V1 SKUs of Application Gateway/WAF should also consider migrating to the V2

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09

May

Simplifying AI with automated ML no-code web interface

https://azure.microsoft.com/blog/simplifying-ai-with-automated-ml-no-code-web-interface/

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07

May

Azure App Service update: Free Linux Tier, Python and Java support, and more

Web applications continue to be at the center of business-critical applications for many Azure App Service customers, whether it’s helping migrate existing applications into the cloud or innovate by adding new functionality to delight end-users. We recently celebrated a couple of important milestones for Azure App Service, crossing the mark of over 2 million applications and websites hosted on Azure App Service and 550,000 monthly active customers. Our recent customer success story with LaLiga media and entertainment company from Spain illustrates some of the amazing work our customers are doing leveraging Azure App Service and Cognitive Services or AI to build truly engaging experiences.

We’re excited to share new capabilities for Azure App Service, especially those that focus on enabling a richer set of applications, both Microsoft stack and open source, to be hosted efficiently on our platform-as-a-service.

Build, deploy and run Node.js, Python, and PHP apps using the perpetually Free Tier with App Service on Linux! Python (3.7, 3.6, 2.7) support Linux is now generally available. Java 11 is now available on Windows and Linux. A new intrinsic build system on Linux handles resolving and installing Node.js and Python package dependencies as well as running custom build scripts. Linux

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08

Apr

Introducing the App Service Migration Assistant for ASP.NET applications

This blog post was co-authored by Nitasha Verma, Principal Group Enginnering Manager, Azure App Service.

In June 2018, we released the App Service Migration Assessment Tool. The Assessment Tool was designed to help customers quickly and easily assess whether a site could be moved to Azure App Service by scanning an externally accessible (HTTP) endpoint. Today we’re pleased to announce the release of an updated version, the App Service Migration Assistant! The new version helps customers and partners move sites identified by the assessment tool by quickly and easily migrating ASP.Net sites to App Service. 

The App Service Migration Assistant is designed to simplify your journey to the cloud through a free, simple, and fast solution to migrate ASP.Net applications from on-premises to the cloud. You can quickly:

Assess whether your app is a good candidate for migration by running a scan of its public URL. Download the Migration Assistant to begin your migration. Use the tool to run readiness checks and general assessment of your app’s configuration settings, then migrate your app or site to Azure App Service via the tool.

Keep reading to learn more about the tool or start your migration now.​

Getting started

Download the App

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11

Mar

Run your code and leave build to us
Run your code and leave build to us

You’ve followed an excellent walkthrough and built a solid prototype web app. You run npm start locally and browse to http://localhost and all looks great. Now you’re ready to put your app in the cloud, utilize a managed database and managed authentication, and share a link with all your coworkers and friends. But wait a minute, it looks like you’ll first have to set up cloud pipelines and container images, then brush up on Bash or PowerShell and write a Dockerfile. Getting your app to the cloud is more work than you anticipated. Is there a faster way?

We’re happy to share that yes there is a faster way. When you need to focus on app code you can delegate build and deployment to Azure with App Service web apps. Push your git repo directly to Azure or point to one hosted in GitHub, Azure DevOps, or BitBucket and we’ll take care of building and running your code the way you expect. You may be using this already for your .NET apps; we now support Node.js and Python as well.

Do you write apps in Node.js, JavaScript, or TypeScript? We’ll install your dependencies and use the build steps specifed in

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25

Oct

What’s new in PowerShell in Azure Cloud Shell
What’s new in PowerShell in Azure Cloud Shell

At Microsoft Ignite 2018, PowerShell in Azure Cloud Shell became generally available. Azure Cloud Shell provides an interactive, browser-accessible, authenticated shell for managing Azure resources from virtually anywhere. With multiple access points, including the Azure portal, the stand-alone experience, Azure documentation, the Azure mobile app, and the Azure Account Extension for Visual Studio Code, you can easily gain access to PowerShell in Cloud Shell to manage and deploy Azure resources.

Improvements

Since the public preview in September 2017, we’ve incorporated feedback from the community including faster start-up time, PowerShell Core, consistent tooling with Bash, persistent tool settings, and more. 

Faster start-up

At the beginning of PowerShell in Cloud Shell’s public preview, the experience opened in about 120 seconds. Now, with many performance updates, the PowerShell experience is available in about the same amount of time as a Bash experience.

PowerShell Core

PowerShell is now cross-platform, open-source, and built for heterogeneous environments and the hybrid cloud. With the Azure PowerShell and Azure Active Directory (AAD) modules for PowerShell Core, both now in preview, you are still able to manage your Azure resources in a consistent manner. By moving to PowerShell Core, the PowerShell experience in Cloud Shell can now run on

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02

Jul

Azure Search – Announcing the general availability of synonyms

Today we are announcing the general availability of synonyms. Synonyms allow Azure Search to associate equivalent terms that implicitly expand the scope of a query, without the user having to provide the alternate terms.

A good example of this capability was demonstrated at the recent Microsoft Build conference, where we showed how NBA.com searches their vast photo library of players, owners, and celebrities. In this application Azure Search synonyms are used to enable nicknames of Lebron James such as “The King” or “King James” to be returned regardless of which of the three terms are used in the query.

In Azure Search, synonym support is based on synonym maps that you define and upload to your search service. These maps constitute an independent resource, such as indexes or data sources, and can be used by any searchable field in any index in your search service. Synonym maps use the Apache Solr format as outlined in the example synonym map below:

POST https://[servicename].search.windows.net/synonymmaps?api-version=2017-11-11 api-key: [admin key] { “name”:”mysynonymmap”, “format”:”solr”, “synonyms”: ” USA, United States, United States of American Washington, Wash., WA => WAn” }

In the above example, you can see there are two types of synonyms that are

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