05

Nov

Best practices for alerting on metrics with Azure Database for PostgreSQL monitoring

Whether you are a developer, database administrator, site reliability engineer, or a DevOps professional, monitoring databases is an important part of maintaining the reliability, availability, and performance of your PostgreSQL server. There are various metrics available for you in Microsoft Azure Database for PostgreSQL to get insights on the behavior of the server. You can also set alerts on these metrics using the Azure portal or Azure CLI.

With modern applications evolving from a traditional on-premises approach to becoming more hybrid or cloud-native, there is also a need to adopt some best practices for a successful monitoring strategy on a hybrid and public cloud. Here are some example best practices for using monitoring data on your PostgreSQL server, and areas you can consider improving based on these various metrics.

Active connections

Sample threshold (percentage or value): 80 percent of total connection limit for greater than or equal to 30 minutes, checked every five minutes.

Things to check: If you notice that active connections are at 80 percent of the total limit for the past half hour, verify if this is expected based on the workload. If you think the load is expected, active connections limit can be increased by

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05

Nov

Best practices for alerting on metrics with Azure Database for MySQL monitoring

Whether you are a developer, database administrator, site reliability engineer, or a DevOps professional, monitoring databases is an important part of maintaining the reliability, availability, and performance of your PostgreSQL server. There are various metrics available for you in Microsoft Azure Database for MySQL to get insights on the behavior of the server. You can also set alerts on these metrics using the Azure portal or Azure CLI.

With modern applications evolving from a traditional on-premises approach to becoming more hybrid or cloud-native, there is also a need to adopt some best practices for a successful monitoring strategy on a hybrid and public cloud. Here are some example best practices on how you can use monitoring data on your MySQL server, and areas you can consider improving based on these various metrics.

Active connections

Sample threshold (percentage or value): 80 percent of total connection limit for greater than or equal to 30 minutes, checked every five minutes.

Things to check: If you notice that active connections are at 80 percent of the total limit for the past half hour, verify if this is expected based on the workload. If you think the load is expected, active connections limit can

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05

Nov

Azure.Source – Volume 56
Azure.Source – Volume 56

Now in preview Local testing with live data means faster development with Azure Stream Analytics

Live data local testing is now available for public preview in Azure Stream Analytics Visual Studio tools, which enables you to test jobs locally from the IDE using live event streams from Azure Event Hub, IoT Hub, and Blob Storage. The new local testing runtime can read live streaming data from the cloud or from a local static file. It works the same as the cloud runtime Azure Stream Analytics and therefore supports the same time policies needed for many testing scenarios. The query runs in a simulated environment suitable for a single server development environment and should only be used for query logic testing purposes. It is not suitable for performance/scalability and availability testing.

Also in preview Azure Event Grid, Advanced filtering – Public Preview Azure Container Instances custom Virtual Network support is in preview Azure App Service new Virtual Network Integration capability is in preview Apache Spark jobs gain up to nine times speed improvement with HDInsight IO Cache Approve and audit support access requests to VMs using Customer Lockbox for Azure Power BI service update Now generally available Avere vFXT for Azure

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02

Nov

11/6 November Update for Power BI Embedding with Ted Pattison and the Microsoft Dev Team

https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/11-6-november-update-for-power-bi-embedding-with-ted-pattison-and-the-microsoft-dev-team/Source: https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/11-6-november-update-for-power-bi-embedding-with-ted-pattison-and-the-microsoft-dev-team/           Discuss the latest updates to Power BI embedding features offered through Azure and the Power BI Service

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02

Nov

Your Power BI guide to SQL PASS Summit 2018
Your Power BI guide to SQL PASS Summit 2018

https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/your-power-bi-guide-to-sql-pass-summit-2018/Source: https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/your-power-bi-guide-to-sql-pass-summit-2018/           SQL PASS Summit 2018 is here!  The Power BI team is going to have another strong presence at the Seattle Convention Center next week, and we can hardly wait to see you there.

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01

Nov

Export to PowerPoint is now generally available and looking ahead at what’s coming next

https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/export-to-powerpoint-is-now-generally-available-and-looking-ahead-at-what-s-coming-next/Source: https://powerbi.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/export-to-powerpoint-is-now-generally-available-and-looking-ahead-at-what-s-coming-next/           We are pleased to announce that the ability to export your Power BI reports to PowerPoint is now generally available

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01

Nov

Four models businesses like yours are using to monetize IoT

This post was co-authored by Peter Cooper, Senior Product Marketing Manager, Azure IoT and Mark Pendergrast, Director of Product Marketing, Microsoft Azure.

It’s easy to talk about all the cool things your company might do to leverage the Internet of Things (IoT). Figuring out how you’re actually going to make them work for your business is a bit more challenging — particularly the part about how to monetize them.

IoT technologies have major potential to open new revenue streams. Capitalizing on them often requires out-of-the-box thinking and a willingness to take smart risks.

We’ve helped thousands of customers around the world profit from IoT. Over the course of these engagements, we’ve found that their monetization models tend to fall into four categories. Here are some options to consider as you build your approach — take a look:

1. The one-and-done: one-time purchasing

A one-time purchase is a common model. IoT connectivity is added as a feature, allowing products to be sold at a premium or to stand out from the competition. This approach works great for scenarios where repeating, revenue-generating services are not required, and your products don’t need ongoing support. For example, many wearable devices and connected home

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01

Nov

Avere vFXT for Azure for HPC workloads now generally available

We are very excited to share the general availability (GA) of Avere vFXT for Azure. This culminates months of effort beginning when Microsoft welcomed Avere to the Azure family earlier this year. Customers can now leverage the Avere vFXT to run their high-performance applications in Azure.

The scope of Microsoft Azure’s solutions for high-performance computing (HPC) continues to broaden with Avere vFXT being the latest product to transition from testing to general availability. Avere joins a stellar portfolio of products like Azure Virtual Machines, Azure Batch, Azure CycleCloud, and networking technologies such as Azure ExpressRoute, that helps bring these demanding projects into the cloud without sacrifices.

Since public preview began in late August 2018, customers across the globe have moved new workloads to Azure using our high-performance file caching technology. The Avere vFXT has been deployed at scale, providing data access at very low latency, no matter where the file data originated. The Avere vFXT is deployed as a set of Azure Virtual Machines, adjacent to your cloud-based HPC cluster. The software runs as a cluster of VMs, enabling very high scale and throughput capacity for compute clusters of any size. Sources of storage can also connect into the Avere

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01

Nov

Azure Cosmos DB – A polymorphic database for an expanding data universe

There is a discussion that occurs frequently in the data world today, which centers around comparisons between traditional databases that are based on relational theory e.g. Oracle or SQL Server and a more modern wave of platforms commonly referred to as “NoSQL” databases. Proponents from both types of databases tend to get into disputes concerning, “which database is best?” However, this can be a misguided point of contention. To understand why, it can help to trace back through history, and reflect on how NoSQL databases first rose to prominence.

In the past 15 years, database technology has radically expanded beyond what could be described, to use a physics analogy, as a singularity in the initial conditions of our data universe: transactional processing using relational databases. This expansion has grown with improved technology and adoption, fueled by demand for the capability to process more data, as well as different kinds of data. There has been a revolution in the exchange of data, precipitated by the social media and mobile age. This has given rise to the increased popularity of different transient, flexible storage mediums, and protocols such as XML and JSON. While these became de facto standards in various forms of

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31

Oct

Deliver the right events to the right places with Event Domains

As we continue to see our community grow around Event Grid, many of you have started to explore the boundaries of complexity and scale that can be achieved. We’ve been blown away with some of the system architectures we have seen built on top of the platform.

In order to make your life easier with some of these scenarios, we decided to dedicate much of the last few months to building two features we are very excited to announce today: advanced filters, and Event Domains – a managed platform for publishing events to all of your customers. In addition, we’ve been working to improve the developer experience and make Event Grid available in Azure Government regions.

Event Domains

Become your own event source for Event Grid with Event Domains, managing the flow of custom events to your different business organizations, customers, or applications. An Event Domain is essentially a management tool for large numbers of Event Grid Topics related to the same application, a top-level artifact that can contain thousands of topics. With a Domain, you get fine grain authorization and authentication control over each topic via Azure Active Directory, which lets you easily decide which of your tenants or

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